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Home inspections

katharina

Registered Member
When we bought our house there was a laundry list of inspections that could be done. Each allowed an out if there were issues or put the burden of correcting the issue in the hands of the seller. We settled on a couple of inspections, but didn't quite belley up to the Inspection Buffet. Not sure if I would have done it differently, but... :cool:
We were given a list of things that should be done and there were a few things that needed to be done before closing (i.e. railing on the stairs) and I was so glad we had that done.
 

benji

New Member
If a buyer can move forward in a home purchase with knowledge of how everything works they can be confident in how thigns work. However, what often happens is you work with a realtor who is representing the seller. They will be very pleasant to you (after all they want you to buy the house), but they will not offer you advice on what steps you should take. It's possible to find an agent to represent your interests, but even that should not prevent you from doing your homework. :stare:
 

katharina

Registered Member
They will be very pleasant to you (after all they want you to buy the house), but they will not offer you advice on what steps you should take. It's possible to find an agent to represent your interests, but even that should not prevent you from doing your homework. :stare:
I think that even if a realtor *is* thinking he or she is representing your interests, it still takes much homework. They can't check everything... ours didn't, nor did the inspector person who happens to be a really good friend. People just miss things, so homework, absolutely.
 

mamab

Registered Member
It's been a while since I've been here. I see that people are still discussing the home inspector things. How long did the inspector take for the inspection? I've heard it said that an inspection can be done in 2-3 hours. Personally, having been with my husband when he's done his inspections, it's never taken less than 4 hours. Of course, he's very thorough and generally gives a 60+ page report with photos.

What type of report did you get, Katharina?
 

katharina

Registered Member
What type of report did you get, Katharina?
As far as time goes, I wasn't here, but I'd have to assume it was at least 3 hours. We got a report and the realtor got one, I assume the same thing. It was the basic things they need to check on and then a few extra items that he found on his own.
 

mamab

Registered Member
Personally, unless there was a reason the realtor NEEDED the report, I wouldn't have let them have it. The report is for the prospective buyer, to help them know what they're getting themselves into, to have a bargaining chip if there is more than meets the eye wrong with it, to help them get a better price if they decide to purchase the house. I cannot see any reason why the realtor would need the report, unless the buyer just wanted them to have it.

A home inspection report can come in a couple of different forms. The easiest, most common is the checklist form. This has a list of items that the inspector checks and then checks off what is present or not present. This is the least informative report.

Another report is a narrative report. This is based on a checklist, but tells what the inspector actually found wrong, if there was anything. It is more in-depth. This also gives the inspector a chance to give suggestions about possible ways to address certain problems.

The third type is a combination of the two. You get the basic checklist and then a little bit of narrative.

All home inspection reports should include photographs of "discrepancies" so that the buyer can see what the problem is for themselves. The inspector should also be available to show the buyer the problems they found, and discuss them.

Obviously some problems aren't going to be a big deal, like paint chipping or light bulbs being burned out. However, there are some problems that require immediate attention, missing balustres or handrails on a 6 ft. high porch or foundation problems. The buyer always the option of what they do with the information, whether they require that the seller make the necessary repairs first, or if they will request that the seller take some off the price and they do the repairs themselves.
 

katharina

Registered Member
The third type is a combination of the two. You get the basic checklist and then a little bit of narrative.
I don't remember if we had the actual checklist or not, but definitely the narrative and I was very glad for it. It was good to know what we'd be dealing with and luckily it wasn't anything huge. :)
 
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