HipHop: Beyond Beats & Rhymes

Discussion in 'Music' started by redsoxocd, Nov 17, 2009.

  1. redsoxocd

    redsoxocd living on the border

    I work at a multi media program and today we had to watch the documentary HipHop: Beyond Beats & Rhymes. I found it very interesting to watch and a lot of it just made me extremely mad. After watching the video we had to write a response to it.


    Here's what I wrote on it:



    The video showed me exactly what I consider hip-hop in today’s culture to be. Hip-hop subjects women to be the targets for men to act innappropriately towards. The men in the video say that they are trying to make a way for their families, but is this what they really want to show them? All they rap about is killing each other and having sex with women.

    Little boys grow up listening to this music and they idolize the rap and hip-hop artist. They want to be like them. They want to have those careers. They begin to think that it’s the only way they will be able to make a living. Hip-hop teaches them that it is okay to be a thug. That it is okay to view women as less than them.

    Then you have little girls who watch the videos and they want to become the dancers in it. They think that it’s okay to dress the way that the dances do; to dance the way that they do. They learn that they are supposed to let men treat them like they are just pieces of property, to be bought or sold at anytime.

    Hip-hop does nothing good for today’s culture. It just reinforces the stereotypes about blacks. It seems like, black people this it’s okay to degrade themselves and their culture just to make a quick buck. They see drug use and alcohol abuse to be a normal thing for them to do. They do not realize that all of this is wrong. And then when they are caught doing it, they accuse “the white man” as being racist towards them.

    All of these things are reasons why I choose not to listen to hip-hop and rap. I refuse to listen to lyrics where people are constantly being put down. I feel that I would be disrespecting myself if I did so. I grew up listening to that music and now people do not realize why I have switched genres. I do not like to see my culture treating themselves as less than man; treating each other as less than man.

    Hip-hop today is just a prime example of how the media can be a poison to society.

    If you want to watch the video, its 55 minutes long, and can be viewed in google videos for free.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2009

  2. Merc

    Merc Certified Shitlord V.I.P. Lifetime

    Hip Hop is often differentiated from rap from what I've seen where hip hop is the more artistic, meaningful material and rap tends to be the whole "fuck your sister, shoot your momma, imma balla" type horse shit. It's upsetting because there is a lot of great hip hop and rap out there but what gets popular is well, let's face it, what most people like. Hip hop and rap are music styles born out of oppression, thus they tend to be rebellious anthems against modern living and society. However, modern rap has taken a turn for materialism and sexism, choosing instead to be about how awesome owning stuff is and how bad some guy is going to fuck up some other guy. Ironically, the music created by those who felt oppressed it now oppressing that very race with its stereotypical portrayal of black people and insensitive views of basically every social issue in the world.

    Except pimps. Rap looks positively on pimps.
     

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