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earthquakes

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
Now though, because of changes in technology, new sources of data are becoming available that are giving scientists much more information about an earthquake, both during and after the event. One example is Twitter. Because it’s a public system, scientists can use filters to pinpoint messages being sent about a specific topic, in this case earthquakes. When an earthquake occurs, such as the one that struck in Virginia this past August, researchers can watch in real time as people send messages about it, outpacing the quake itself. This kind of information can help researchers more accurately track characteristics of an individual earthquake which can help in building better prediction models going forward. Read More Here
This article reminded me of when I heard a earthquake before I felt it. It only took a few seconds from when I heard a loud noise to when the shaking started. Has anyone else had something like that happen to them? I was wondering if that was unusual. I would of contacted them at that time about this but I don't see how it would help in predicting a quake.
 

oxyMORON

A Darker Knight
Wow that's pretty cool. What does an earthquake sound like?

Technology is helping us predict where earthquakes will occur, but aside from already known fault lines, it really is impossible to really predict when an earthquake will occur. There are patterns we can look at. Usually no strong earthquakes would follow a major one, but even after a huge on in Japan, they experienced a relatively large one again around New Year's.
 

Dekzper

Registered Member
That's really cool they can use the online community to learn more. I've only been in one earthquake that I was actually aware of. I slept through a 4.8 but I was awake when the 5.4 earthquake happened. I didn't say anything online till after it was over and I don't remember how soon I heard the noise cause I couldn't walk on the floor and I was totally freaked! It was the first time I ever really felt the ground shake like that.
 

Impact

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
Wow that's pretty cool. What does an earthquake sound like?

Technology is helping us predict where earthquakes will occur, but aside from already known fault lines, it really is impossible to really predict when an earthquake will occur. There are patterns we can look at. Usually no strong earthquakes would follow a major one, but even after a huge on in Japan, they experienced a relatively large one again around New Year's.
A really loud rumbling coming for you. I mean, you could mistake it for a train or a truck passing by until the shaking hits.

Also...strong earthquakes will usually hit again in a similar spot, especially at a new ruptured fault line such as the one in Christchurch, New Zealand. Predictions say they will be having them for the next 30 years before that finally settles. Even while I was there for 3 weeks there were a couple between the 5 and 6 range. Admittedly none like the initial 7.1 that struck.

To address the OP...it seems a little silly that scientists think twitter will help characterise earthquakes. They have the actual equipment to measure these things...a bunch of people talking, half of which probably haven't been in an earthquake before, aren't really going to have much to add that the experts don't already know.
 
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