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Dr. Kevorkian Dies

Dabs

Registered Member
Jack Kevorkian, assisted suicide advocate has died today, at the age of 83, in a Detroit hospital. He had been hospitalized for kidney and respiratory problems, altho the actual cause of death is not known yet.
His long time friend and attorney, Mayer Morganroth, was at his bedside, he said Kevorkian went peacefully, he didn't feel a thing.
So, some called him Doctor Death.
Some hated him, others adored him. What is your opinion of him??..and now, his passing.
 

Jeanie

still nobody's bitch
V.I.P.
I didn't disagree with his cause at all. He was a bit reckless, though, so his actions didn't do a lot to advance the cause. In fact his actions set physician assisted suicide WAY back in Michigan, because the State legislature passed laws regarding physician assisted suicide because of Dr. Jack.

I kinda liked him, though; he was quite the character. I was sad to hear that he died.
 

MenInTights

not a plastic bag
He was a pretty smart guy being that he was a cold blooded murderer that found a way to by-pass the legal system and commit his crimes with the public's approval. I don't have the exact numbers in front of me, but from what I remember at least half of his victims were not terminally ill. Many of them were simply depressed and could have been helped with medication.
 

Dabs

Registered Member
He did spend 8 years in prison for his beliefs. I wonder how many other people would do that??
I have heard the pain from cancer is a horrible feeling, as well as some other diseases. I don't like seeing people in pain, I don't like pain.
Dr. Kevorkian didn't go seeking out people to kill, people came to him. If I were in a situation where I was dying, and I know my family was suffering from watching me suffering, Dr. Kevorkian would be the first person I would have called.
 

Jeanie

still nobody's bitch
V.I.P.
He was a pretty smart guy being that he was a cold blooded murderer that found a way to by-pass the legal system and commit his crimes with the public's approval. I don't have the exact numbers in front of me, but from what I remember at least half of his victims were not terminally ill. Many of them were simply depressed and could have been helped with medication.
Don't you think that's a bit harsh, calling him a cold blooded murderer? As Dabs said, he didn't seek out people to "kill". He provided a way out for people who were suffering. It's true that some of the people he helped (or "helped" if you wish, but calling them victims is taking it too far) were not terminally ill, and that's why I said he was reckless.
 

CaptainObvious

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
But if they're not terminally ill but depressed and they came to him so he could assist them commit suicide, doesn't that come pretty close to being a murderer?

I'm not saying he didn't do some compassionate things for some really sick people, but I would characterize some of his actions much stronger than murder.
 

MenInTights

not a plastic bag
He did spend 8 years in prison for his beliefs. I wonder how many other people would do that??
8 years is a fairly light sentence. He would have never got such a light treatment had he not won over much of the public.

I have heard the pain from cancer is a horrible feeling, as well as some other diseases. I don't like seeing people in pain, I don't like pain.
Dr. Kevorkian didn't go seeking out people to kill, people came to him. If I were in a situation where I was dying, and I know my family was suffering from watching me suffering, Dr. Kevorkian would be the first person I would have called.
That's one thing. Its another issue entirely when someone comes in depressed or in pain and rather than help the person find help you kill him. The guy was a lot smarter than your typical mass murderer. Gotta give him credit for that at least.

Detroit Free Press report
According to a report by the Detroit Free Press, 60% of the people who committed suicide with Kevorkian's help were not terminally ill. The report further asserted that Kevorkian's counseling was too brief (with at least 19 patients dying less than 24 hours after first meeting Kevorkian) and often lacked a psychiatric exam, even when Kevorkian had been alerted that the patient was unhappy for reasons other than their medical condition. The report also stated that Kevorkian failed to refer at least 17 patients to a pain specialist after they complained of chronic pain, and sometimes failed to obtain a complete medical record for his patients, with at least three autopsies of suicides Kevorkian had assisted with showing the person who committed suicide to have no physical sign of disease. In response, Kevorkian's attorney Geoffrey Fieger published an essay stating, "I've never met any doctor who lived by such exacting guidelines as Kevorkian ... he published them in an article for the American Journal of Forensic Psychiatry in 1992. Last year he got a committee of doctors, the Physicians of Mercy, to lay down new guidelines, which he scrupulously follows."[14] Fieger added that Kevorkian found it difficult to follow his "exacting guidelines" due to "persecution and prosecution", adding "[H]e's proposed these guidelines saying this is what ought to be done. These are not to be done in times of war, and we're at war."[15] In a 2010 interview with Sanjay Gupta, Kevorkian stated an objection to the status of assisted suicide in Oregon, Washington, and Montana. Only in those three states is assisted suicide legal in the United States, and then only for terminally ill patients. To Gupta, Kevorkian stated "What difference does it make if someone is terminal? We are all terminal."[16] In his view, a patient did not have to be terminally ill to be assisted in committing suicide, but did need to be suffering. However, he also said in that same interview that he declined four out of every five assisted suicide requests, on the grounds that the patient needed more treatment or medical records had to checked.[17]
 

Jeanie

still nobody's bitch
V.I.P.
I just wouldn't call him "cold-blooded". He didn't kill people indiscriminately like serial killers or mass murderers. The people who came to him wanted to die. Yes, they likely could have been helped. Yes, he should have referred them to pain specialists and/or to mental health professionals. But he didn't go killing people who didn't want to die. I'm not saying what he did was right. I'm saying it's wrong and judgmental to call him a cold-blooded murderer. It's not for you to judge.
 

CaptainObvious

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
I just wouldn't call him "cold-blooded". He didn't kill people indiscriminately like serial killers or mass murderers. The people who came to him wanted to die. Yes, they likely could have been helped. Yes, he should have referred them to pain specialists and/or to mental health professionals. But he didn't go killing people who didn't want to die. I'm not saying what he did was right. I'm saying it's wrong and judgmental to call him a cold-blooded murderer. It's not for you to judge.
Actually it is for society to judge. If he killed people who wanted to die that were not terminally ill and could have been helped, then not only did he break his oath as a doctor but he committed murder.

I'm no phychiatrist but it appears to me, just from looking at some of the things he did, he became obsessed with helping people die. He became obsessed with watching people die. That's just my take, and I might be wrong, but if not then I don't think putting the words "cold-blooded" before murderer is far off.
 
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