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Divisive Does breaking laws help society?

sunrise

aka ginger warlock
V.I.P.
I understand why initially this may be something that could get an immediate no to the question, how could breaking of laws help a society and change things for the better? Laws are there to keep people and indeed countries in line and working in a way that benefits everyone.

A recent holiday however made me think slightly differently. I went to visit Prague which as many of you may now was help under a Communist reign until roughly three decades ago. Communism was stopped because people took a stand and said that what they were doing was insane, even Mikhail Gorbachev and Margaret Thatcher agreed that it was.

This is just one example of where breaking the law and defying those in charge can alter how things change, how things can be better and so that suffering can end. In recent years laws have been put in place but the US and the UK governments where nothing could be sent to Iraq due to the war after September the 11th and indeed before that, the idea being they did not want to aid Saddam in any way, this included medicine for the sick and the weak, the USK were not getting in the way, they were stopping things and many people broke these laws to help people who needed help and had nothing to do with the war.

Race laws, women's rights, gay movements, slavery, all these things altered because someone said "this is not right" and breaking the law in the process was a part of the process.

With that in mind are all crimes really "crimes" or do you think they are important steps in some cases to bring a bigger picture to the front? Has someone like Julian Assange done some good or is he very much someone who should be locked up and the key thrown away?
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
Breaking a law is good for society if that law is bad for society and it brings about a change that is beneficial for all. Most of the time there are better ways to get a law changed other than breaking them unless your talking about a dictatorship that won't listen.

What if someone had broke the law and killed Hitler early on, look how many lives would have been saved, that would of definitely helped society. Someone that kills a bunch of innocent people or an individual because you hate them helps no one, their just common murderer's that deserve what they get.
 

MenInTights

not a plastic bag
America was founded on Nature's Law. We are endowed with self-evident truth. Sometimes we have a duty to break the law. It may have been illegal to house a run-away slave for example, but Nature's Law, our conscience, tells us its the right thing to do.
As far as examples today, you could probably convince me Snowden did the right thing.
 

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
Breaking a law is good for society if that law is bad for society and it brings about a change that is beneficial for all. Most of the time there are better ways to get a law changed other than breaking them unless your talking about a dictatorship that won't listen.

What if someone had broke the law and killed Hitler early on, look how many lives would have been saved, that would of definitely helped society. Someone that kills a bunch of innocent people or an individual because you hate them helps no one, their just common murderer's that deserve what they get.
I would argue that it's not morally right to kill someone when they haven't yet done anything wrong (Terminator 2 comes up in my mind as an example for this, those that have seen the film should know what I'm talking about).

If you're talking about killing Hitler towards the beginning of his regime, yeah, I would agree with that statement. Doesn't really matter what the law says in that instance, you'd know you were doing the right thing.

America was founded on Nature's Law. We are endowed with self-evident truth. Sometimes we have a duty to break the law. It may have been illegal to house a run-away slave for example, but Nature's Law, our conscience, tells us its the right thing to do.
As far as examples today, you could probably convince me Snowden did the right thing.
I was going to mention Snowden as well. He knew he was breaking the law but he went ahead and leaked information because he deemed that it was the morally correct thing to do.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I would argue that it's not morally right to kill someone when they haven't yet done anything wrong (Terminator 2 comes up in my mind as an example for this, those that have seen the film should know what I'm talking about).

If you're talking about killing Hitler towards the beginning of his regime, yeah, I would agree with that statement. Doesn't really matter what the law says in that instance, you'd know you were doing the right thing.
I was talking about at the beginning of his regime when he first started rounding up the Jewish people and started a war, not when he was a baby.
 

penny4URthoughts

Registered Member
In real life, breaking laws would most of the time lead to chaos. However, the best time to break a law is if the effects from it are very immoral and lead to even worse consequences than when you break the laws that kept things in order.
 

gentleviper

New Member
If you break the law and societal agreement results in a change in the law, then all is good. Otherwise, you lose and learn stuff about your cell mate you never wanted to know. Anyone can pick and example then went one way or the other. It's more like is society read for someone to lead by breaking the law and then everyone follows suit.
 
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