Do you trust infomercial testimonials?

Do you trust infomercial testimonials?

  • Yes, I generally trust them

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    14

Mirage

Administrator
Staff member
V.I.P.
#1
Do you trust infomercial testimonials?

I do some acting on the side now and then and EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE I come across people looking for actors to share pre-written testimonials on camera about various products. I personally refuse to be involved in things like that.

I also do graphic design and photoshop work freelance and every once in a while I come across a job such as creating FAKE before and after pictures for various products. Seriously. What kind of a person would feel right doing work like that?

Does this mean ALL infomercials are scams? Definitely not. I'm sure a lot of the stuff for sale out there has legitimate benefits. I personally would only buy something if it had a money back guarantee though. That way if it does turn out to be a joke I can get my money back. (Unless it's more than a joke :()

I'm a firm believer in hidden gems when it comes to things that tend to be on infomercials. I don't think they are all scams and I've purchased things from infomercials before that I've been happy with. I do think that some products are put out there just to take advantage of people who will forget to return for a refund in time.
 

Blueyes

Registered Member
#2
So far that I can attest to, the only ones that I think are real are most of the ones that have to do with cooking. I got the Magic Bullet and love it. I need to get the one that has the pocket things next because my friend who just stayed with me has one and he loves it too. Makes making eggs really easy especially when you use the Egg Beaters instead of real eggs because you can't make those into an egg shape without some help and I don't have any extra mold things to do that with.
 
#3
Not since I bought those three magic beans. If I ever catch the bastard!

I actually saw a good documentary on the American informercial scene a few days back with Louis Theroux. I didn't learn anything I didn't already know though. The whole concept is trying to generate enough hype for you to purchase something you likely didn't even need. Judging by the figures quoted in the program, there's more than enough people with cash in their wallets and sensitive ears to generate vast profit for them. That's not to say some of the products aren't worth purchasing but I'm not a fan of window shopping. If I haven't bought something or thought about buying it, I probably didn't need it anyway. I don't give those channels or adverts any time and me and my wallet are happy for it!
 
#4
Thanks to infomercials I now have the skin of a 10 year old, the firmest abs around and I'll never look a day over 30, especially if I keep using my handy dandy roast-a-matic.:nod:

Actually, the only thing I've ever purchased was a Vita-Mix, but only after seeing a live demo at a trade show. I love that thing!

I'm sure there are a lot of products out there that people are regrettably suckered into buying. I've been tempted myself several times.
 
#5
I get intrigued in the commercials, but I don't trust them all. I believe the only one I really trusted was RonCo Knives. Really, how can you not trust cutting stuff? ^_~

When I see infomercials selling exercise equipment, cleaning tools, cooking equipment and junk, I don't fully trust it. I believe that it may work, but for the most part it's a scam to get your money.
 

Saucepan

Registered Member
#6
Not since I bought those three magic beans. If I ever catch the bastard!

I actually saw a good documentary on the American informercial scene a few days back with Louis Theroux.
I saw that too. Also the idea of infomercials seems to be a very American trend, they certainly aren't as big over here (although we do get some clearly American infomercials on late night digital TV stations).

They are made to sell a product...if they don't sell a product they don't do their job, I can't imagine the marketing people behind such adverts having many problems about deceiving the public if it sells the product. For years anti-winkle creams have been sold by actresses who are likely too young to be getting wrinkles in order to make you think the product works.
 

Nightsurfer

~Lucky 13 strikes again~
#7
I never trust the TV Infomercials testimonials, i knew a few people who Did the acting for some of the older ones.

It amazes me when people rush right to the phone and call on some of the crap that they sell on TV. The only thing I know that actually works as good as they claim is the "Shark knife sharpener" my folks bought one and I tried it out when i was at their house last month and it realy works! Good too I might add.

Hell even our regular TV commercials are fake too. You would be amazed to know that most of the food you see on commercials is fake or rigged in some way.
 

Mirage

Administrator
Staff member
V.I.P.
#8
I THINK the ones that say "The following testimonials are from actual people who used our product. They are not paid actors" are legitimate for the most part. They can't legally say that if it's not true BUT there may be some loop hole I don't know about.
 

Merc

Certified Shitlord
V.I.P.
#9
Being someone with sales experience, I know the tricks they use and how they sell you the product. You can find some genuinely great products but you must beware the exaggeration.
 

Saucepan

Registered Member
#10
I THINK the ones that say "The following testimonials are from actual people who used our product. They are not paid actors" are legitimate for the most part. They can't legally say that if it's not true BUT there may be some loop hole I don't know about.
They may still have been paid...they just aren't paid "actors". They always sound a little forced...

"Me and my wife were going through a messy divorce, but when we got the super step-ladder, 36 ladders in one for half the cost it saved our marriage!"