Copyrights

#1
I have made a paintball board game, which i think is reasonably good. Nothing is finished yet, but eventually i want to post it on the web to see what others think of it. The problem is, its not protected, so anyone can take my ideas without question. Aside from making a copyright, any suggestions?
 

Hiei

The Hierophant
#2
Well, what's the point to the game? Are you going to be firing paint balls at this board game or what? How's it going to actually work?


Also, there's an easy way to get something copywritten without actually getting a patent on it. All you have to do is write out your idea, detail it, and send that in the mail back to yourself so that you get a post date on the envelope. Then just don't open the envelope until someone tries to contest your idea. The post mark will prove that you came up with the idea at such a date and that may or not be enough proof.

But I think you'll probably have to get a patent for anything to actually not be stolen.
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
#3
Also, there's an easy way to get something copywritten without actually getting a patent on it. All you have to do is write out your idea, detail it, and send that in the mail back to yourself so that you get a post date on the envelope. Then just don't open the envelope until someone tries to contest your idea. The post mark will prove that you came up with the idea at such a date and that may or not be enough proof.
Does that work everywhere, though? Remember that copyright laws and methods differ from country to country, and this guy lives in Blighty.

*EDIT: I just found out some info on that through the below website.
UKCS said:
This method (sometimes called ‘poor man’s copyright’), may help in some cases, but it is extremely poor evidence as it is very easy to fake - for example by replacing the actual materials inside at a later date.

The main problem if you send your work to yourself via courier or the postal service (including recorded/tracked and signed for services) or use any other system which requires you to store the work yourself, is that there is no verifiable evidence to say that the contents have not been swapped.
So, sure, you can do it, but most likely any lawyer worth their salt can have it disregarded because of the lack of proof that what you've posted is what was actually in the envelope.*

Honestly mate, I think you'd be better off getting in contact with the UK Copyright Service. You can find their website below, and they'd be much more likely to give you good advice. Not saying anything against our British members, but I'd be more willing to trust the word of an official office over the word of a single person.

The UK Copyright Service - Intellectual property registration centre
 
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theotherone

Registered Member
#4
I'm going to agree with Storm. If it's something worth protecting, make sure to go through all the legal hoops so that nobody can take credit for your idea.