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Cops Say/Do the Darndest Things - "High Speed Pursuit Syndrome"

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
I wish I was joking.

High Speed Pursuit Syndrome refers to a condition that police officers may suffer from during a high speed chase. When a police officer gets into a high speed and dangerous chase, he may get so angry and pumped up with energy that the adrenaline rush may cause him to carry out violence and deadly force on a suspect at the end of, or during, a pursuit
Personally, I'm having a hard time taking this seriously. It sounds to me like an excuse to be violent with a downed or incapacitated combatant or to simply exercise excessive and brute force without repercussion. Police have come under a lot of scrutiny these past few years thanks to the widespread availability and use of personal video equipment such as cell phones, camcorders and the like. We've even seen them fight back by trying to force laws that make videotaping them illegal.

This should frighten people because for those that do not know, a policeman's word tends to be pretty solid and they're the ones writing the report on what happened during a given incident. We've seen a lot of police brutality and it seems a fair amount of them get off easy.

This is another good example of "High Speed Pursuit Syndrome" (those poor 'suffering' cops):

Birmingham Police Beating Video - YouTube

Thank god they beat that unconscious guy down. Who knows what he would have done should he have been left to lay there. You know, all unconscious and stuff. Maybe his phone was ringing and they were trying to wake him up? Yeah, that's probably it.

Does anyone else actually believe this? To me it just sounds like adrenaline and a complete lack of judgment, not some separate medical condition.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I am going to have to wait until tomorrow to watch this. I think some people when pumped up on adrenaline are more prone to violence than others, that's when fights usually break out in bars, etc. If there is a way they should test cops to determine how they would handle a situation involving a high speed chase. We don't need cops going off on people for no reason.

If something isn't done people are going to end up losing all respect for cops. I've already seen enough videos of cops setting people up or beating them up if I were on a jury I wouldn't automatically assume the cop was telling the truth.

I guess that's why they didn't beat the crap out of OJ it was a slow speed chase and there wasn't any adrenaline involved.

I use to like to drag race and during the race I was very calm, cool and only thought about the race. At the end of that quarter mile I would be doing about 130 or so. When I stepped out of that car I was so hyped up on adrenaline I couldn't stand still. So I can understand what adrenaline can do to you but I have never felt like beating the crap out of someone.
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
I'm not sure why you think this is so bogus, Merc. It seems pretty obvious to me that adrenaline alone could play a large part of that. Add in the fact that someone fleeing the police is endangering bystanders and the police themselves, plus (to the minds of police) practically confessing to another crime, and it makes a lot of sense that this would result in a spike of violence.
 

CaptainObvious

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
I'm not sure why you think this is so bogus, Merc. It seems pretty obvious to me that adrenaline alone could play a large part of that. Add in the fact that someone fleeing the police is endangering bystanders and the police themselves, plus (to the minds of police) practically confessing to another crime, and it makes a lot of sense that this would result in a spike of violence.
This pretty much sums up my thoughts. It seems to be something like this could be legitimate. Anyone who has been in a situation like this where there is a huge spike in adreneline would understand that could play a large part of that. That isn't to make an excuse for bad behavior, or that it's present in every high-pressure situation, but it could play a part.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I just watched the video and its just plain stupid on those cops part to beat a guy that is unconscious. I can understand how adrenaline could play a part in overreacting but this goes farther than that.
 

AnitaKnapp

It's not me, it's you.
V.I.P.
I don't know. I've had surges of adrenaline before and it didn't make me override my good sense and judgment to hurt other people.

I guess it could possibly play a part, but I wouldn't think that it would be the norm, but merely an exception.

That video is absolutely ridiculous. The dude was unconscious and they were beating the shit out of him. I just don't understand how they can make excuses for going as far as they did. MAYBE if he was still resisting arrest...but he was unconscious!
 

CaptainObvious

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
In all fairness being a cop and dealing with certain types of people and chasing criminals in vehicles is a different kind of adrenalin rush that most of us have experienced.

That said, based on what we see in this video, the cops went too far. This certainly looks extreme.
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
Adrenaline is adrenaline, the only variable is the amount of it. Needless to say, it's highly unlikely that it could be applied to as specific a situation as a police chase. Since it was first used in the Rodney King trial, it's more than likely a clever excuse made to play to the jury's sensibilities by making it sound like these men had no control over themselves.

Which brings up another question, why are you hiring cops that are unable to keep calm or at least rational in such situations?
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
Adrenaline is adrenaline, the only variable is the amount of it. Needless to say, it's highly unlikely that it could be applied to as specific a situation as a police chase. Since it was first used in the Rodney King trial, it's more than likely a clever excuse made to play to the jury's sensibilities by making it sound like these men had no control over themselves.
Actually, no. I don't think adrenaline is adrenaline. Or rather, the chemicals are the same, but the way the brain (and body) reacts to it varies. Fear is different than anger, is different than being startled, is different than anticipation, is different than exhilaration.

At least now, nobody is saying that it excuses cops or that they have no control over themselves. But if it's true, it might present possible ways to fight it.

As far as I know, there's no reason to assume it was first introduced with the Rodney King case.

Which brings up another question, why are you hiring cops that are unable to keep calm or at least rational in such situations?
Why does every company in the history of companies hire people who they regret?
 

CaptainObvious

Son of Liberty
V.I.P.
I wouldn't say the adreneline I feel when standing in front of a jury is just less than say a soldier in the middle of combat, or a police officer who has to worry about some punk shooting at him every time he pulls someone over. I'd say it's vastly different. Since I've never been in either of those situations I'm not going to pretend I know what it's like or the stress they are put under, but I can imagine it messes with your thinking much more so than what I experience.

I don't know how they can be assured how a cop is going to react in a situation. I also see these as isolated events, most police officers have never even been accused of things like this. This is one cop who just went too far, it seems, I don't think it's indicative of cops in general.
 
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