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NewGamePlus

Registered Member
Andrew said:
It is the buyers responsibility to find out everything they want ahead of time, before bidding.
But if they do that and the seller doesn't answer, they would then have a valid reason not to pay for the item. This is significantly different from the alternate situation where the seller doesn't have a concern, or has one but doesn't ask, and just decides to back out for no good reason. I would think, hope, and demand that ebay be intelligent enough to recognize the difference between those two bidders. One is significantly innocent, the other is not.
 

Mirage

Secret Agent
Staff member
V.I.P.
Well yes, but if they do not hear back from the seller, they should not buy the item in the first place and just hope it's what they need.

Technically unless the seller has a return policy, all sales are final, and it's the buyer's responsibility to do their homework before buying. If they do not get an answer back from the seller, they are simply making an uninformed purchase, and according to eBay, they are still required to pay for said item.

This is why if you do not get a response from the seller, you should NOT just go ahead and buy the item. It just causes trouble for everybody if you end up not liking what you got.
 

NewGamePlus

Registered Member
Andrew said:
it's the buyer's responsibility to do their homework before buying.
That depends on the seller though. The buyer is not completely responsible for what he does, so if a dispute arises (unless he can read the seller's mind across the internet), it's partially the seller's responsibility. logically speaking. Whether ebay is logical is a different question altogether.
 

Bunny_roses

what? no pink?
00vega said:
That depends on the seller though. The buyer is not completely responsible for what he does, so if a dispute arises (unless he can read the seller's mind across the internet), it's partially the seller's responsibility. logically speaking. Whether ebay is logical is a different question altogether.
well I don't aggree with this, I think it is completely up to the buyer to find out the most he/she can about something BEFORE they place their bid. lets face it, Ebay is different than just walking into Sears or any other store and checking something out before we buy it. Would you be more likely to buy something from Sears or a guy by the road selling stuff out of the trunk of his car? Same thing with Ebay, you don't know who you are buying from until you check his feedback and see what other's are saying, AND asking them a question or two. If they don't respond then a red flag should go up. (just as if you see a guy by the road selling stuff from the trunk of his car)

buyer beware......isn't that the saying? ;)
 

Julie

Registered Member
I've gotta go with Bunny, Angel, & Andrew on this one. When the buyer places a bid they are entering into a legal, binding contract to purchase the item from the seller. Heck, after you enter your bid amount...on the next page before you click "confirm bid" it tells you this in big letters. If the buyer has questions, they should be asking questions BEFORE placing a bid.

On the rare occasion that I buy something on eBay or any other site, if I have a question I send it to the seller. If my question goes unanswered, then that item ends without a bid from me. End of story. If they can't take be dependable enough to answer a quick question, then I don't care to do business with them.

On the seller end of things, I totally agree with Snipes. I wish more people would ask questions BEFORE bidding. I can't tell you how many times I've had an auction end & suddenly I'm getting asked questions from the winner.
 

NewGamePlus

Registered Member
Bunny_roses said:
well I don't aggree with this, I think it is completely up to the buyer to find out the most he/she can about something BEFORE they place their bid.
Seems you missed the implied meaning in my post, so let me make it clearer then.

When the buyer asks the question to the seller, they have done all they can do. They can do no more. Not a single extra thing can be accomplished. The buyer has reached the limitation to which they can act. Is any of this sinking in yet? Don't interpret my words superficially. If it sounds too easy to understand, there's a 99% chance it is.

So in that instance, when the buyer asks the question, the seller has an obligation to respond. If he does not, then he shares part of the blame if something goes wrong in the auction result.

If they don't respond then a red flag should go up. (just as if you see a guy by the road selling stuff from the trunk of his car)
But that should not stop the buyer from buying the item. If the seller doesn't give a clear answer, then they've unnecessarily put themselves in a position where something can go wrong. On the other hand, if they answer, then they've erased all doubt ahead of time. Putting these two different sellers in the same category and treating it like they have an equal right not to accept returns or cancelled bids is absolutely ridiculously ignorant.

GENERALIZATIONS = VICTIMIZATION
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Julie said:
I've gotta go with Bunny, Angel, & Andrew on this one. When the buyer places a bid they are entering into a legal, binding contract to purchase the item from the seller.
That doesn't mean that the "legal, binding contract" is right. That's the "because ebay says so" logic, which is never an acceptable logic to use to justify anything.

Heck, after you enter your bid amount...on the next page before you click "confirm bid" it tells you this in big letters. If the buyer has questions, they should be asking questions BEFORE placing a bid.
In case you're just joining us, we already covered that. We're already assuming that the buyer's done everything they can (aka. asking questions). Whether or not the buyer asked a question or not is not the relevant issue. It's whether or not the buyer who already asked the question should have more options than the buyer who did not ask it that we are discussing. I say yes. That's what I've been saying since I started posting here.

Short attention span on this internet thing isn't there???
 
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Julie

Registered Member
I primarily sell on eBay & occasionally buy, so this is my view on the subject of 'questions' asked:

On my listings, I give clear descriptions of the item or use the pre-filled information if available (ex. book, video game, cd, dvd, etc.). I also offer 3 different shipping options for domestic & international, this way any buyer can choose whichever option they prefer.

That being said, I STILL get the occasional "How much to ship to...?" And I politely reply to them to please use the shipping calculator on my listing. I offer local pick-up at no charge & that is in my description as well. I STILL get people who ask "Is local pick-up available to avoid shipping cost?" And every time I still reply with my standard yes. On other occasions, I will get buyers where the first one asks a specific question about the item & when I answer I post it on the auction & I will still get asked the SAME question 3 or 4 more times throughout the auction, keep posting the same question (from different people, but pretty much same question) & people still keep asking.

So when I go looking to buy something, if I have any questions...I make sure there is ample time left on the listing & ask my questions. If they go unanswered, then I do not bid. If I do choose to bid, then I am taking my chances.
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00vega said:
That doesn't mean that the "legal, binding contract" is right. That's the "because ebay says so" logic, which is never an acceptable logic to use to justify anything.

In case you're just joining us, we already covered that. We're already assuming that the buyer's done everything they can (aka. asking questions). Whether or not the buyer asked a question or not is not the relevant issue. It's whether or not the buyer who already asked the question should have more options than the buyer who did not ask it that we are discussing. I say yes. That's what I've been saying since I started posting here.

Short attention span on this internet thing isn't there???
First, I am not "just joining you". I know it was already covered. I was just stating what I agreed with on here.

And NO, it is not a matter of a short attention span. It is a matter of someone who sells & buys on eBay & deals with both ends of transactions all the time. If you don't like what we have to say, then you don't have to respond. Everyone on here is just expressing their opinions & not everyone is going to agree with YOU.
 
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NewGamePlus

Registered Member
Well those are simply bad questions. Obviously if they've already been answered, then the buyer hasn't really thrown any more responsibility the seller's way anyhow.

And sure, time is always an issue. That's pretty much the only spot where the grey area comes in. There was this one item recently that I had been watching the whole week, and when there was four hours left in the auction, panic struck me because I just thought of an important question that I wish I would have asked a long time ago (if I did, I may not have watched the item). Well, I asked the question but didn't get the answer, but I felt confident on what the answer would be and bid anyways when there was about 20 minutes left. Did everything in the last 20 to win the auction. Then after it was over, I asked the question, and thankfully I got the answer I wanted. Found out the person was away from the computer and unavailable to answer. So it was a little bit of a chance, but still, it would be nice if people would either provide a good amount of information or schedule their auctions to check in before they close. I know I always check my auctions near closing time. That's usually where all the real action is anyways.
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And yeah, sorry about the sarcasm. Sometimes things get intermixed with each other where you think someone is talking about one thing and it turns out it was something totally different. I musta mistaken it.
 
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Julie

Registered Member
I don't get bad questions all the time, those were just some examples. My point was more to the fact that I take responsibility as a seller & answer everyone's questions, regardless of what they might be.

On a buyer end, let me share this one with you:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Gateway-GP6400c...778468004QQcategoryZ51147QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

These Quik Drop stores are all over down here & we buy from them occasionally. I was interested in getting this one (most likely to upgrade it & have hubby sell during one of his weekends down at the flea market), however I did not see anywhere in the description the processor speed. I emailed them the question (there was still 6 days left on the auction at the time) to ask them the speed of the processor. They answered me back saying "they didn't know, it didn't say anywhere on the specs". I re-read thru the auction & took note on how they said the system boots up fine & has no problems. So I emailed them again & told them to start the computer up, go on the start menu, go to my computer, right-click on properties, & all the system info (including the processor speed) would be there. Auction now has 2 days left & I have yet to hear back from them, even after I as the buyer gave the seller instructions on how to find the info I needed!

This is a perfect example of one that will end without me bidding on it because the question I asked is the determining factor as to whether or not I will bid. No answer to my question, no bid. :shake:

And, btw, apology accepted. I am quick with my responses to stuff like that but I am also quick to forgive as well. Sometimes just gotta think before you type on here. :lol:
 

Bunny_roses

what? no pink?
00vega said:
Seems you missed the implied meaning in my post, so let me make it clearer then.

When the buyer asks the question to the seller, they have done all they can do. They can do no more. Not a single extra thing can be accomplished. The buyer has reached the limitation to which they can act. Is any of this sinking in yet? Don't interpret my words superficially. If it sounds too easy to understand, there's a 99% chance it is.

So in that instance, when the buyer asks the question, the seller has an obligation to respond. If he does not, then he shares part of the blame if something goes wrong in the auction result.


But that should not stop the buyer from buying the item. If the seller doesn't give a clear answer, then they've unnecessarily put themselves in a position where something can go wrong. On the other hand, if they answer, then they've erased all doubt ahead of time. Putting these two different sellers in the same category and treating it like they have an equal right not to accept returns or cancelled bids is absolutely ridiculously ignorant.

GENERALIZATIONS = VICTIMIZATION[/QUOTE]
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no I didn't miss any of that the first time, so you are just repeating yourself. if people want to deal with the hassle of cancelling a bid or returning an item, hey go for it! not my thing. if it doesn't stop you or anyone else from buying the item. hey good for you. I am stating my opinion of what I would do and that is.......I would not bid on the item if I don't get an answer....end of story..............
 
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