• Welcome to the PopMalt Forums! Whether you're new to forums or a veteran, welcome to our humble home on the web! We're a 20-year old forum community with thousands of discussions on entertainment, lifestyle, leisure, and more.

    Our rules are simple. Be nice and don't spam. Registration is free, so what are you waiting for? Join today!.

Collage/ Uni

Applesauce

New Member
So hey,

Currently studying year 11 in South Australia, wishing to become a police officer after school, however, I really want to go to uni/ collage before hand for a better application and for the life experience it gives.

What courses should i take up that will help me out in my situation?
 

Nicola

Registered Member
Sociology would be beneficial, you should look into what sociology courses entail but generally you study society. Why do some people commit crimes? Why do some do badly in school and others do great? Why are some people religious and others not?

I imagine a course in sociology would better help you undestand the society in which you hope you have an important role in keeping safe and stable.
 

Kazmarov

For a Free Scotland
If you'd like to rise through the ranks in the police force, you'll probably have to take (at some point, so college is a good time) courses in management, public speaking, conflict resolution, and politics. Sociology is an excellent suggestion- it's probably something that'd look very good on a resumé, as is criminal justice and law.

Here's some US information about education and police careers:

Many entry-level applicants for police jobs have completed some formal postsecondary education, and a significant number are college graduates. Many junior colleges, colleges, and universities offer programs in law enforcement or administration of justice. Many agencies pay all or part of the tuition for officers to work toward degrees in criminal justice, police science, administration of justice, or public administration and pay higher salaries to those who earn one of those degrees.
http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos160.htm#training

But especially for higher-level jobs (i.e. more than just an officer, someone who manages people) you'll need at least a bachelor's in something like criminal justice, or management. Basically, they're looking for people who a) know the system and b) can lead. Education is only a part of it, but it helps buttress it.
 
Last edited:
Top