• Welcome to the PopMalt Forums! Whether you're new to forums or a veteran, welcome to our humble home on the web! We're a 20-year old forum community with thousands of discussions on entertainment, lifestyle, leisure, and more.

    Our rules are simple. Be nice and don't spam. Registration is free, so what are you waiting for? Join today!.

Writing Climbing a Few of Japan's 100 Famous Mountains

danwiz

Registered Member
If you'd like to see some mountain photos from Japan - I just finished up the first draft of a new book which I have been working on for a while now. You can find it at: Climbing a Few of Japan's 100 Famous Mountains.

PLEASE read and follow the directions - repeated here to emphasize their importance.

[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, Sans-Serif]I recommend RIGHT clicking on the link and then clicking on "Save Target As.." (Internet Explorer) or "Save Link As..." (Firefox). Specify a folder for storage when prompted, click on the "Save" button, and open the file after it is fully downloaded. Using this method results in fewer problems than merely clicking on the download button and waiting for something to happen.
When you view the file in Adobe Acrobat please go to the "View" Menu Item and select "Page Display", "Two-Up" and also "Show Cover Page During Two Up". This will allow you to view it as it will appear in print - with odd numbered pages on the right side and even numbered pages on the left.

Any feedback you can offer will be appreciated.
[/FONT]
 
Last edited by a moderator:

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
That's really cool Dan.

Mountains are nothing new to me, I live in Colorado, but all of that green landscaping is really something for me to enjoy. Our mountains have a lot of rocks, sand, and evergreen trees, nothing really bright green.

To comment on some geology. On page 21, you mentioned a volcanic upwelling that may have eroded. Actually, that looks completely sedimentary which would mean it can't be volcanic. Hope that helps :)
 

danwiz

Registered Member
dDave, I totally agree that it looks like it's a sedimentary deposit, but my puzzle is how the heck did it end up here on a high slope of this volcanic mountain range? Any insight you can give would be gratefully appreciated so that I can change that paragraph in the book before it goes for public sale.
 

dDave

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
dDave, I totally agree that it looks like it's a sedimentary deposit, but my puzzle is how the heck did it end up here on a high slope of this volcanic mountain range? Any insight you can give would be gratefully appreciated so that I can change that paragraph in the book before it goes for public sale.
Well, I'm not saying the whole area isn't volcanic in general (I haven't seen the whole area so I can't comment on that), you can have sedimentary rocks form on top of igneous rock layers though. That one particular structure is sedimentary though. You can tell by the way that it's weathered as well as the original horizontality of the closely packed strata (visible in the layers), igneous rocks simply do not behave like this.

I'm no expert but I'd say the fact that only that one little piece remains is a sign that there's been a lot of significant weathering and erosion in that area.

I'm thinking something along the lines of the formation of Chief Mountain on a much MUCH smaller scale. http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/lewis/chfsketch.jpg Basically there used to be one large flat layer here and a large portion of it was eroded away to leave what we now know as Chief Mountain.
 

danwiz

Registered Member
dDave, I was just coming back to say that I think I've possibly figured it out, and you have already responded. Yes, as I said, I totally agree that the one piece definitely looks sedimentary - and in fact, surely is. So, what I think I've figured out is that just because a mountain is volcanic does not mean that, as it pushed its way up through the crust of the earth and started spouting lava, it did not push up some old deposits which were lying above and adjacent to it on the ocean floor as it pushed its way!

Thanks so much for forcing me to think this through, it's really appreciated. That page in the PDF has been changed if you want to download it again.
 

danwiz

Registered Member
If anybody's interested, Climbing a Few of Japan's 100 Famous Mountains - Volume #2: Mt. Chokai (Choukai) is now available through the link given in post #1. It has been approved by CreateSpace and a printed proof has been ordered and already shipped.

I am expecting proof #2 of Volume #1 in the mail today. I found several typos and some photos did not print like I was hoping for, so had to correct the typos, reduce the reds in a few photos and increase the brightness/contrast in a few other photos. In general though, it came out looking great!
 
Last edited:

danwiz

Registered Member
Volume 1 and Volume 2 are now both available through Amazon, CreateSpace or your favorite bookstore (write down the ISBN from the details pages which you can find by clicking on the link in Post #1) and ask them to order it for you.

Volume 1 is now also available in a Kindle Edition, but seeing as it's a book of color photographs I would hope that you do not buy the Kindle Edition for a B/W Kindle reader and then complain about it in a review.

Enjoy
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
You take some great photos. If you don't mind me asking, what type of camera and lenses do you use?
 

danwiz

Registered Member
I use a Canon SX40-HS and my partner uses a Canon SX110-IS, neither of which have interchangeable lenses. Thank you for the fine compliment Major.
 

danwiz

Registered Member
There are now 3 Volumes available. The link to the Volumes is in Post #1.

All 3 Volumes will have Kindle Free Days on January 7 & 8 if you're interested. As these are color photo books you should only snap up these freebies if you're going to read/view on a Kindle Fire, Kindle for PC or Mac or something else which allows you to see/appreciate color photos.

Thanks!
 
Top