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NES Cleaning Your Games!

SamusAran86

Registered Member
Nintendo has always stated never to use 'solvents' to clean your NES cartridges. I completly dissagree.

If you have ever used a cleaning kit, all the slovent is, is watered down rubbing alcohol.

Heres some tips from me!

Dusty/Dirty games:

What you will need: q-tips, Rubbing alcohol or glass cleaner (either one will work, Ive even used plain water, but have a water softener)... possibly a soft brissled tooth brush and a Gamebit

Get the q-tip wet with either the rubbing alcohol or glass cleaner

First, clean the plastic case inside and out. When the q-tip is dirty, use the other end, or a new one (I usually use 4 or more per cart)

To clean the prongs, rub along them (pushing in and out, not side to side) do this to both sides until the q-tips are no longer takeing out dirt.

Allow a few minutes for the cart to dry fully, then test.

If that didnt work, open up the cart with a gamebit screwdriver. ( I ordered mine off ebay) get the toothbrush damp with either solvent, and brush it like you would brush your teeth... use circular motions and dont push too hard unless the dirt is really noticable on the chip. I had to do this to a copy of Double Dragon III that wouldnt work until I brushed the chip!

I hope that helps any classic NES owners out there. If you have any tips of your own please share them in this topic.
 

konspiracy

New Member
I know a better way to clean games

Step 1. pick up game with bottom of cartridge facing you
Step 2. take a deep breath in
Step 3. blow all the dust out of the cartridge
Step 4. if game still wont play, repeat steps 1-3

That's how we did it back in the day, represent! =)
 

Gamechamp

Registered Member
Actually, I think blowing has been proven not to work...

Strange thing is, I never have to clean my old games! They always work! Now, the consoles, that's a different story...

*NES explodes*
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
Blowing does seem to work, but it probably does more harm than good in the long run.
 
I think we're all familiar with the blowing method, and it does seem to work, but not very well. I actually heard from a friend that gently rubbing your finger along the bottom of the cartridge once helps. I'm not sure why, but I've recently used it on some N64 games and it seemed to work.
 

Doc

Trust me, I'm The Doctor.
V.I.P.
Blowing can actually rust the connectors through time, and it's not very good for the cart. I still do it, though, which I really shouldn't.
 

ltk9492

Registered Member
konspiracy said:
I know a better way to clean games

Step 1. pick up game with bottom of cartridge facing you
Step 2. take a deep breath in
Step 3. blow all the dust out of the cartridge
Step 4. if game still wont play, repeat steps 1-3

That's how we did it back in the day, represent! =)
lol thats what i still do, as well as my gameboy games. EVERY TIME i switch games it won't work unless I do this. lol, i lose my breath when I get bored of all the games.
 

yooperchick

Registered Member
It makes you wonder...

1.) Who started the "blowing" method.
2.) How do we all know about it.
3.) Why do so many of us still do it without even thinking about it.
 

Major

4 legs good 2 legs bad
V.I.P.
madgamer said:
It makes you wonder...

1.) Who started the "blowing" method.
2.) How do we all know about it.
3.) Why do so many of us still do it without even thinking about it.
Must be instinct to blow on something if it doesn't work. :lol: I think most people assume there's dust and dirt in there, so blowing makes sense to try to get rid of it.
 

NewGamePlus

Registered Member
If you have ever used a cleaning kit, all the slovent is, is watered down rubbing alcohol.
I once got an official gamecleaning solvent from a used game shop that knew about games, and the key ingredient WAS rubbing alcohol. I also was given some pink razorblade shaped things with a soft felt-like tip on both sides. Felt is probably better than Q-tips so that strands don't come off and you can rub it several times fast getting a good scrub along both sides.

Actually, I think blowing has been proven not to work...
Wrong. Blowing has been proven TO work, and it has not only worked for me for 10+ years, but it has now become a prerequisite for getting 90% of my old games to work.

Blowing does seem to work, but it probably does more harm than good in the long run.
AYE! Now I'm eating my words. :sick: But seriously, even back in the day, it would always work when I did it, like 98% of the time.

Blowing can actually rust the connectors through time,
Well Steve... that's because rust happens when a moist source comes into contact with a metal source and stays there for a good long time... which is why you must blow only when your mouth is dry.

Must be instinct to blow on something if it doesn't work.
hmmm.... good line. I'mma gonna use that someday. :)
 
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