Cheney: 'Can't Claim Perfection' on No-Torture Policy

Steerpike

Registered Member
#1
Here is a link to the full article.

ABC News: Cheney: 'Can't Claim Perfection' on No-Torture Policy

Responding to accusations from a top Pentagon official that at least one Guantanamo detainee was tortured during interrogation, Vice President Dick Cheney acknowledged there may have been a "problem" with the way military personnel interrogated individual prisoners.

"I can't claim perfection," he said on "News Hour with Jim Lehrer," while reiterating once again the United States does not approve of or engage in torture as a matter of policy.

Cheney cited the soldiers who abused Iraqi inmates in the Abu Ghraib prison scandal as an example of interrogators "who weren't managed properly."

Susan J. Crawford, who was named by Defense Secretary Robert Gates to serve as the convening legal authority of military commissions, told the Washington Post that the treatment of Guantanamo detainee Mohammed al Qahtani, the so-called "20th hijacker," "met the legal definition of torture." She added that she decided to dismiss charges against Qahtani because he had been tortured.

The revelation is the first time that a senior administration official has called the United States' treatment of detainees torture.
What are all of the implications of this?

Discuss.
 

ExpectantlyIronic

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#2
The main think I'm concerned about, is making sure future administrations and folks in the CIA don't think torturing folks is legal, acceptable, effective, or moral. To those ends, I think Obama should offer a full pardon to those responsible if they come forward with the truth, and if they don't, there should be full-scale investigation, and those found to be guilty should be prosecuted. Also, the law should be changed to make it perfectly clear that no government official can carry out or sanction torture under any circumstances, and that stuff like water-boarding is torture.
 
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