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Cheerleading case stirs up dispute

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
Cheerleading case stirs up dispute - Omaha.com

Girl born with no arms below the elbow and no legs wants to be a cheerleader. She tried out three times for the sqaud and never made it. Her parents complained to school officials. They want the scoring process changed.

Are you siding with the school on this one or the parents?
 

Comet

Registered Member
After reviewing the limited facts given in the article I would like to see the girl be allowed on the team. Despite being incapable of performing some of the actions of a cheerleader she can still be effective and an inspiration. It is not difficult in the least to think outside the box and figure out creative ways for this young girl to participate and fulfill her dreams. The important thought of this story is it doesn't do any harm in the grand scheme of things to allow her on the team. Besides, she'll probably do a tremendous job and be an inspiration for many.
 
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shelgarr

Registered Member
The school. Cheerleading requires skills, and skill require arm and legs. Besides to perform her stunts the other members would be impacted because they need to carry her. Wouldn't that affect how everyone could perform?
 

Mirage

Secret Agent
Staff member
V.I.P.
This is a tough one. Sure, the nice thing to do is let her on the team. It's not her fault that she was born this way and she certainly has more drive and determination that most people in her condition. The storybook ending would be to let her on the team and have her cheer from her wheelchair, happy as can be that she "can do it".

Unfortunately, this coin has two sides. The other being the sad truth that she can't do it. Having no arms and no legs would restrict her ability to do much more than participate in the chants. She couldn't take part in anything else really. No hand springs, no coordinated dance routines, no jumping, flipping, etc. It's terrible that she was born this way, but let's be honest, I'm sure this team cut or turned down at least one other girl who was better suited for the requirements.

Whatever is decided, nobody can say they didn't have a tough choice on their hands. I believe both options could very well be the right choice. I don't feel there is a right or wrong answer here. I think the squad should not be legally required to include people who are incapable of participating at a normal level. I also think that if they choose to incude her anyway, they would get somebody who will really show them a thing or two about what it really means to be excited and optimistic no matter what is thrown your way. If a girl with no arms and no legs is doing all she can to cheer on the sidelines, you'd think players with both arms AND legs would be inspired on more than just the playing field.

I don't think she should be allowed on the team, but I would like to see them invite her anyway. In the end, it won't hurt anybody to have her there, and it will probably do a lot more positive for those around her than they realize. This is the type of emotional journey that you see made into movies, depending on how the school board rules of course.
 

Bubbles

I ♥ Haters
I’m with the school.

I admire her courage for trying out for the cheerleading squad (trying is half the battle, right?), but the school shouldn't have to lower the bar for ONE person. I hate to sound like a jerkFACE, but you need to be able to do cartwheels, maintain a certain weight, jump, hold pom-poms and do other physically demanding things which she clearly can’t do. And by going ahead and suing the school because she got cut is a bit too much, in my opinion. All that’s saying to me is that: “I’m special and the standards do not apply to me. The world should accommodate me and everything should revolve around me.”

We all have our limitations and we just need to accept them. I’m sorry for sounding like a douche, but that’s the reality.
 
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CaptainObvious

Embrace the Suck
V.I.P.
I’m with the school.

I admire her courage for trying out for the cheerleading squad (trying is half the battle, right?), but the school shouldn't have to lower the bar for ONE person. I hate to sound like a jerkFACE, but you need to be able to do cartwheels, maintain a certain weight, jump, hold pom-poms and do other physically demanding things which she clearly can’t do. And by going ahead and suing the school because she got cut is a bit too much, in my opinion. All that’s saying to me is that: “I’m special and the standards do not apply to me. The world should accommodate me and everything should revolve around me.”

We all have our limitations and we just need to accept them. I’m sorry for sounding like a douche, but that’s the reality.
I'm in complete agreement with this.

First off she's a hero to me just for showing up and trying, more than once no less. Secondly, the bar just cannot be lowered for anyone. Standards are standards and they cannot be lowered for anyone. My heart goes out to the girl and her family, but we just cannot accept accomodations that are different.

I wish I had enough talent to play Major League Baseball, unfortunately I don't. I accepted those limitations and moved on.
 

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
I really like what Brix said, because both avenues are tough choices to make. As far as the rules themselves changing, I tend to agree that this shouldn't be the case. However, I think it would be really cool and grown up of the squad/school to let this girl onto the team as a special case. They could do that without changing anything systematically, and I seriously doubt that other people would get mad. I have a hard time even picturing other girls that made the squad being upset. I think that she'd be a good inspiration as a cheerleader in some capacity, and that the squad could surely work out some special routines with her involved. But at the end of the day, I can see why people wouldn't want to change up the entire system of rules.
 

Millz

Better Call Saul
Staff member
V.I.P.
I agree with what everyone is saying here. It would be awesome if the school let her on the team as someone to inspire the rest of them and the teams but they shouldn't be required to do so because of her limitations. It sounds bad to say that when I type it out but it's up to the school and not her. It's not like they are refusing to let her try out and giving her the cold shoulder. She's just not meeting the standards and requirements to be a cheerleader.
 

viLky

ykLiv
WOW, what cocksuckers:

In the performance portion, Julia received her lowest score in the jumps/kicks category and her highest marks in the communication skills and enthusiasm/spirit categories.
Really? I mean... REALLY? Come on, that's just sad. Evil viLky had a snicker at this, I must admit. Don't tell nobody! >8)

I don't want to belittle cheerleading, BUT... come on, it's cheerleading. Let her go out there, have some fun and let her enjoy herself. I do understand that if this cheerleading squad is in a competition that it could post a problem, but can't they just substitute her if it ever came to that? If it's just for school, then... pssf, let everybody on.
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
From a legal standpoint, it sounds like the school is within their rights.

From a "Do the right thing" perspective, I dunno. I want to say they should let her participate, but I'm not so sure. People get cut from cheerleading all the time. It sounds like she would be willing to do things from her wheelchair, and that no unnecessary burden would be placed on the school if they accepted her as an extra squad member. But if they allowed her as an extra squad member, wouldn't they then have to accept every single person who wanted to make the team, as long as those people all didn't place any extra burden on the school? They might end up with a cheer squad of a couple hundred people. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but something to keep in mind.
 
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