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'Caylee's Law?'

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
'Caylee's Law' online petition builds interest after verdict - USATODAY.com

After the popular trial involving Casey Anthony being acquited of all major charges in regard to the murder of her daughter, an Oklahoma woman is petitioning a law that:

would make it a felony for parents or caregivers to not report the death of a child to authorities -- accidental or otherwise -- within one hour. It also would make it a felony for guardians to not notify law enforcement of the disappearance of a child within 24 hours.
FYI, I believe that this is being brought up because (1) Casey Anthony didn't report that her daughter had been missing until 30 days, and (2) one of the arguments being given by the defense was that the little girl might have died of accidental drowning in the swimming pool (I think so, at least, on number 2....if someone that had followed the trial more closely could clarify that one, it would be much appreciated).


  • What are your thoughts on the framework of this law being promoted by citizens? Overall, would you like to see it in passed? Would it be difficult to enforce? Does it hold up, constitutionally speaking?
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
I have this gut feeling there is some glaring problem with it but I can't quite figure it out. It sounds great in theory but how strict would they be about this one hour thing? Not to sound heartless or insensitive, but what if you're out camping and a tragic accident occurs, say you don't have a phone and it would take hours to get back to civilization, will you face this charge?
 

Pugz

Ms. Malone
V.I.P.
I was thinking the same thing, maybe it should be reported within an hour of finding the body?

Other than that, it seems straight forward.
 

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
I have this gut feeling there is some glaring problem with it but I can't quite figure it out. It sounds great in theory but how strict would they be about this one hour thing? Not to sound heartless or insensitive, but what if you're out camping and a tragic accident occurs, say you don't have a phone and it would take hours to get back to civilization, will you face this charge?
Yeah, that's a really good point...it would have to come with some sort of conditional enforcement, because not everyone's living situation/circumstances are the same.

Maybe they'd just up the amount when writing the actual legislation, I dunno...this is all very hypothetical at this point.

I was thinking the same thing, maybe it should be reported within an hour of finding the body?

Other than that, it seems straight forward.
Well Pugz the issue mentioned in the article is that averages with child abductions/murders show that the poor kiddos are usually killed within an hour of abduction. So one police officer had said (I'm paraphrasing) 'Yeah, it's somewhat obstructive when people aren't reporting this because time is precious.' So it's also as much about disappearances as it is about accidental deaths. But I'd assume it would be an hour within finding the body if you weren't there when it happened, or an hour within finding out if the child was with someone else.
 
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Dabs

Registered Member
I would think any parent would report their child missing IMMEDIATELY...especially when they are the age as this little Caylee Anthony, age 2.
I could see if a child was older, perhaps 12 or 13, maybe the parents might check with the child's friends, but at age 2..no way!...this fucking Mother knew where her child was. And for her to wait 31 days, ah hell..don't get me started. I'd fry the bitch if I could.
I'm sure this Oklahoma woman has very good intentions, whether or not the rest of the world thinks that, will remain to be seen.
 

Wade8813

Registered Member
Yeah, my immediate thought was that the "one hour" thing isn't going to work.
Well Pugz the issue mentioned in the article is that averages with child abductions/murders show that the poor kiddos are usually killed within an hour of abduction. So one police officer had said (I'm paraphrasing) 'Yeah, it's somewhat obstructive when people aren't reporting this because time is precious.' So it's also as much about disappearances as it is about accidental deaths. But I'd assume it would be an hour within finding the body if you weren't there when it happened, or an hour within finding out if the child was with someone else.
The thing is, if someone discovers they can't immediately find their kid, they might spend the first hour LOOKING for the kid. Especially if they live on a large property.
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
The thing is, if someone discovers they can't immediately find their kid, they might spend the first hour LOOKING for the kid. Especially if they live on a large property.
I think it probably means an hour from discovering your child has died, not from the exact time.
 

Dabs

Registered Member
Yeah, my immediate thought was that the "one hour" thing isn't going to work.


The thing is, if someone discovers they can't immediately find their kid, they might spend the first hour LOOKING for the kid. Especially if they live on a large property.
I see what you're saying Wade, but in my opinion, if the child is very young, age 2 or so, if you look around your yard and yell and get nothing, then I would be picking up my phone and calling for police. I wouldn't be taking any chances.
***Adding, what parent in their right mind, would not phone for police when they have discovered their child dead?- as soon as they make such a sad discovery.
 
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Wade8813

Registered Member
I think it probably means an hour from discovering your child has died, not from the exact time.
I'd hope so, but who knows?

And honestly, I imagine some parents spending a few hours somewhere between catatonic and hysterical upon suddenly discovering their kid is dead.

I see what you're saying Wade, but in my opinion, if the child is very young, age 2 or so, if you look around your yard and yell and get nothing, then I would be picking up my phone and calling for police. I wouldn't be taking any chances.
***Adding, what parent in their right mind, would not phone for police when they have discovered their child dead?- as soon as they make such a sad discovery.
That's the thing - are we just talking about kids around 2? The article just says "a child".

My first thought would be to call a medic just in case they can save the kid. But if the kid was obviously dead beyond all saving, I don't think my first thought would be to involve the police unless I suspected murder.
 

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
Yeah, my immediate thought was that the "one hour" thing isn't going to work.


The thing is, if someone discovers they can't immediately find their kid, they might spend the first hour LOOKING for the kid. Especially if they live on a large property.
Good point, Wade. I mentioned some sort of conditional enforcement (time varies based on circumstance), but that could get way too sticky and legislators/law enforcement officials/lawyers/etc. would drown in the details with all of this. I mean in a trial they'd have the time-stamp from a 911 call but if it was one of the cases of reporting a child being missing (not accidental death) it would involve building a lot of difficult proof.

Just as an idea it's sounding tough for this to turn into a viable law, but the thought behind it sounds noble and good.
 
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