Cannibal Killer 'Ate Cellmate While Alive'

wooly

I am the woolrus
#1
This is one of the most horrific strories i've heard in a long time:

A prisoner dubbed France's Hannibal Lecter has gone on trial for ripping out his cellmate's lung and eating it.

Nicolas Cocaign admitted responsibility at the court in Rouen: "I made several appeals for help, saying I was a man capable of being dangerous. I took action, and then they took me seriously."
The 39-year-old faces life in prison if convicted for the murder of Thierry Baudry in 2007.
He said he flew into an "uncontrollable" rage after Baudry gave him a "dirty look" after he ordered him to wash his hands after using the toilet in the tiny cell they shared.
"I had a sexual urge, an adrenaline rush," Cocaign told the transfixed court.
He said that after beating Baudry, he took a pair of scissors and plunged it into his back, neck and chest a dozen times before holding a plastic bag over his head "for five minutes" to suffocate him.
"I take a razor blade and I open his chest. I plunge my hand in and I take out what I think is the heart but which in fact is a piece of lung, which I put into a Tupperware container," Cocaign said.
Before the trial Cocaign, whose face is covered in tattoos of tears and a skull, told investigators he had wanted to eat the victim's heart to "take his soul".

A medical examiner testifying at the trial said the victim was still alive when his cellmate cut into him.
Dr Patrick Laburthe, who performed the post-mortem on Baudry, said a piece of his lung had been removed "with almost surgical precision, with a very sharp blade".
"We also found blood in Thierry Baudry's right lung, which means he was still alive when the organ was cut," he told the court.
Baudry's mutilated body was found by a prison guard and the post-mortem revealed two chest muscles and part of his left lung was missing.
His family were not in court for the medical examiner's testimony because their lawyer told them the horrific details might be too much for them.

Cocaign remained expressionless during the medical examiner's testimony.
Earlier, Cocaign told the court he had a long history of mental problems and that the murder might have been avoided if prison authorities had not ignored his repeated appeals for psychological help.
The court also heard of Cocaign's troubled life - he was adopted aged three, and has had many scrapes with the law.
At the time of the killing, he was behind bars on an armed robbery conviction and was awaiting trial in two other cases, including for attempted rape while armed.
Mental health experts have been asked to testify as to whether Cocaign was sufficiently sane to be responsible for his acts.
The trial continues.
While this killer committed a heinous crime, i think that he should be treated with psychiatric care, and even studied, rather than just locked up in a cell and treated as a plain killer. Some blame has to be placed on the prison authorities who didn't listen to his requests for psychiatric help.

Definitely going to be an interesting case to follow as it unfolds.
 
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Puck

Registered Member
#2
Reading this story actually made me gag a few times.
Yes, Cocaign is definitely crazy but he's a threat, not only to himself but to the people around him.
The authorities probably should have listened to him in the first place and placed him under better surveillance but who would believe someone, a criminal no less, that they're more dangerous than the State has already declared them.

Personally, I think this man should be sentenced to death for being able to commit such a horrible crime and not even having any kind of remorse.
 

wooly

I am the woolrus
#3
Personally, I think this man should be sentenced to death for being able to commit such a horrible crime and not even having any kind of remorse.
Usually i'd think something along these lines, but i think the fact that he requested care before he committed the crime as he said he was dangerous shows an unwillingness to commit the crime. He knew he was capable of it, but he wanted the sufficient help so that he wouldn't commit the crime. For this reason i'd sooner send him into psychiatric care rather than a prison cell or death sentance.
 

Puck

Registered Member
#4
Usually i'd think something along these lines, but i think the fact that he requested care before he committed the crime as he said he was dangerous shows an unwillingness to commit the crime. He knew he was capable of it, but he wanted the sufficient help so that he wouldn't commit the crime. For this reason i'd sooner send him into psychiatric care rather than a prison cell or death sentance.
Where he can get drugs and a nice comfy bed?
I just don't agree.

He knew what he was capable of, yes.
He tried to tell the proper authorities, yes.
But, that doesn't mean much when you're capable of such horrible things, just because someone gave you a 'dirty look'
 

Nixola

Boom Boom Pow!
#5
What's interesting about the story is that he knew he was this dangerous and he admitted it and told the prision authorities that he was dangerous but they didn't even listen! They should have taken more tests or assessments of him. You'd think just to be safe they would put him in a single cell.

Just out of curosity, what crime did he commit to be put in jail in the first place, don't think it said in the article.
 

wooly

I am the woolrus
#6
Where he can get drugs and a nice comfy bed?
I just don't agree.
I think you could be overestimating the comfort of psychiatric wards :p Plus another benefit of committing him to a psychiatric ward would be to study him and the mind of someone who would committ crimes like this. Using the results of the research will always be useful to the field of criminal psychology.

He knew what he was capable of, yes.
He tried to tell the proper authorities, yes.
But, that doesn't mean much when you're capable of such horrible things, just because someone gave you a 'dirty look'
Nobody, not even Cocaign himself, denies that he was capable of acts, but the fact that he reported it to authorities, because he didn't want to commit this acts shows a difference in intentions. He obviously suffered from mental problems but didn't exactly suffer from evil intentions. he didn't want to be the killer he knew he was capable of being. That has to count for something.

What's interesting about the story is that he knew he was this dangerous and he admitted it and told the prision authorities that he was dangerous but they didn't even listen! They should have taken more tests or assessments of him. You'd think just to be safe they would put him in a single cell.

Just out of curosity, what crime did he commit to be put in jail in the first place, don't think it said in the article.
I was eager to find that out aswell, and according to one report "Cocaign, a married father of two who was on remand facing armed robbery charges". (source: The Daily Mail). If this victim was the first that Cocaign killed then it furthers my belief that he should be treated with psychiatry rather than a prison cell/death. Maybe the stress of being in prison was the catalyst that set off his deep set homicidal, cannabilistic tendancies.
 

Tucker

Lion Rampant
#7
I have to wonder about the correction authorities' criteria for deeming a prisoner dangerous and housing him in a one-man cell. Did they ignore the man's urgent repeated warnings on the basis of his incident-free history? If so, is that prudent and proper? Like the zoo that houses killer animals, a government is responsible for preventing mayhem among those it incarcerates. The victim in this case did nothing to cause his own death. He didn't negligently jump a wall into danger; he was placed there by the authorities, who had the evidence at their fingertips that his ink-faced cellmate had been raising the alarm about his own potential for extreme violence.

As to the attacker, I can't discern beyond doubt from the article alone whether or not he met France's (presumed) standard for insanity absolving him legally of responsiblity for his actions. I'll assume that if he is found to be genuinely insane and not in charge of his thoughts and actions, his caretakers will sentence him to a somewhat more humane and reasoned fate than execution.
 
#8
Nicolas Cocaign admitted responsibility at the court in Rouen: "I made several appeals for help, saying I was a man capable of being dangerous. I took action, and then they took me seriously."
The article quotes Cocaign as stating he asked for help, but has the prison confirmed this? If in fact he did ask for said help, wouldn't that deem him sane enough to stand trial and go to prison rather than a psychiatric ward? Obviously there are a lot of facts that we are unaware of, but I do find it hard to believe that he was mentally unaware of doing what he stated he was capable of before it ever happened. Once again, that's only if he did in fact ask for help.
Perhaps he knew he was heading for prison due to the other charges, and decided to try and obtain a ticket to the mental ward instead.