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Can religion be made irrelevant?

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
Religion is already relatively irrelevant in some advanced nations, but in others (such as the US) superstition still has an important place in society and politics. My question is, can compulsory education (no homeschooling) successfully erase ancient superstitions or is religion too important a part of the human psyche?
Took this from another, thought it could generate some discussion here at GF.

Thoughts?
 

KSpiceFantastic

Haters gonna hate.
Religion, at least in the USA, will never become irrelevant. It is too ingrained in our psyche and our society for it to lose its relevance. I have been raised in a Christian (namely Protestant) family and it is really all that I have known. I haven't been home-schooled and I honestly think that has no say in a religion discussion.

Only when religion is not taught or brought up in families will it become irrelevant.
 

Merc

Problematic Shitlord
V.I.P.
I'm conflicted on this issue to be honest. I'm apathetic personally when it comes to religion. However, I believe people have the right to believe what they want. I also believe that religion has no place whatsoever in our governmental policies and laws set forth to govern the people. It's not even remotely humane to force beliefs on people. I think it's wrong to dismiss all religion as superstition, even though I partially agree, because it's important to a lot of people and helps them live their lives.
 
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Wade8813

Registered Member
Religion is already relatively irrelevant in some advanced nations, but in others (such as the US) superstition still has an important place in society and politics. My question is, can compulsory education (no homeschooling) successfully erase ancient superstitions or is religion too important a part of the human psyche?
If any religion is true, then I'd say never.

Even if all religion is false, I think the person who posted that is underestimating the influence of religion in those countries. According to Least Religious Countries | Gadling.com, Sweden is the least religious nation, and they still have a million people who believe in something (15% of the population)
 

Mirage

Secret Agent
Staff member
V.I.P.
It's not even remotely humane to force beliefs on people.
Isn't the act of enforcing laws the same as forcing a belief on people? Take for example, the belief that killing people is bad (nothing can be truly good or bad in a world where everyone is right in their own mind, mind you)? Aside from social upbringings and religious teachings, in a truly secular society, killing would be neither good or bad, neither acceptable or unacceptable, but simply killing. Nothing can be inherently good or bad in a society where beliefs of some sort are not "forced on people".

And as somebody who doesn't think beliefs should be forced on people, you are free to disagree... Just please keep it to yourself. :nod:
 
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MenInTights

not a plastic bag
Took this from another, thought it could generate some discussion here at GF.
Religion is already relatively irrelevant in some advanced nations, but in others (such as the US) superstition still has an important place in society and politics. My question is, can compulsory education (no homeschooling) successfully erase ancient superstitions or is religion too important a part of the human psyche?
Thoughts?
I wonder how prevalent such anti-Christian ideas are amongst policy makers. My homeschooling friends point to ever increasing rules and regulations of homeschooling and claim erasing homeschooling is a goal of progressive politicians. I've never really thought so, but I haven't made the leap to homeschooling yet, so I don't really know.

I do find it interesting that the goal of this statement above is not to teach the truth or to measure achievement, but rather to erase religion from society. The public education has claimed the theory of evolution to be fact, regardless of the lack of support and in many places has censored any other scientific theories that may point to an intelligent designer. So, in that sense I guess I can agree that at least in some places there is an anti-religious push.

As with most of the problems of society, the answer is decentralized government. You and the rest of the citizens of your state should pay for and govern whatever schooling you choose. To each his own. If you want to live in a state that makes religion irrelevant you should be free to do so just as I would never choose to do that. Given the choice, I would live in a state that had much less public education and left the teaching to churches and community groups.
 
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ExpectantlyIronic

e̳̳̺͕ͬ̓̑̂ͮͦͣ͒͒h̙ͦ̔͂?̅̂ ̾͗̑
Hybrix said:
Isn't the act of enforcing laws the same as forcing a belief on people? [...] in a truly secular society, killing would be neither good or bad, neither acceptable or unacceptable, but simply killing.
No, it's encouraging people to behave in a certain way. You don't have to believe murder is wrong to not be arrested for murder, but rather simply not murder people. As for your suggestion that secularism equates to moral nihilism... I find it bizarre. The two are quite different.
 

Diederick

Registered Member
I'm looking forward to the end of religion in the nations that really matter to mankind. Not that I think I'll see it, but I think it is inevitable people will eventually grow out of these preposterous superstitions.

It's mostly a comforting thought that, eventually, everything will be alright.

Education and openness in all respects is vital for a healthy society. I'm sure it will help in getting the people who don't know out of religious convictions (which they usually know nothing about).
 
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Mirage

Secret Agent
Staff member
V.I.P.
No, it's encouraging people to behave in a certain way. You don't have to believe murder is wrong to not be arrested for murder, but rather simply not murder people. As for your suggestion that secularism equates to moral nihilism... I find it bizarre. The two are quite different.
What if somebody wants to believe that people should not be arrested for murder? What if somebody wants to encourage people to behave by murdering people? Who can tell them them that they are wrong?

Imagine you find a board game. You have pieces, cards, dice, a board, and whatnot, but absolutely no rule book. Who is to say for sure if one way of playing is "the right way"? Popular vote only says which way the majority wishes to play. It could still be wrong. My point is that secularism is the same way. A bunch of people claiming to have the moral high ground while basing those very same morals off of nothing but personal opinion. Religion would claim that a rule book exists. Secularism would claim that a rule book never existed, or was wrong from the beginning. This thread would get the same yes/no/maybe responses by simply asking "Do you know there is a God?"

And to answer the OP directly. Can religion be made irrelevant? Wade's answer pretty much sums up mine. If one religion is true, then no, religion cannot be made irrelevant. If they are all false, then yes, it definitely can. Just comes down to the root question of "Is there a God?"
 
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ExpectantlyIronic

e̳̳̺͕ͬ̓̑̂ͮͦͣ͒͒h̙ͦ̔͂?̅̂ ̾͗̑
Hybrix said:
What if somebody wants to believe that people should not be arrested for murder? What if somebody wants to encourage people to behave by murdering people? Who can tell them them that they are wrong?

Imagine you find a board game. You have pieces, cards, dice, a board, and whatnot, but absolutely no rule book.
I'm not even sure I understand your questions. What if someone wants to believe that people shouldn't be arrested for murder? Will your god smite them? No. They'll go on believing it until they change their minds for whatever reason. Who can tell them they're wrong? Anyone who feels like it. As for your board game question: you never played a game where a rule was in dispute? Never had to make up a rule for a situation where there wasn't one? Never made a house rule? Never changed a rule you didn't like? You're obviously not a gamer. ;)

Though, you may be right that a secular society gets to make up its own rules. I just happen to see that as a good thing. Especially when a lot of the "rulebooks" on offer are so shoddy.
 
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