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California Sinking Faster Than Ever

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I've known for sometime that California is sinking but now with the drought in places it is sinking faster than ever. In one area it sunk over 12 inches mostly in the past 4 months. Then in the Tulare Basin area, including Fresno, has sunk 13 inches in 8 months. Other areas are sinking about 2 inches a month. They are worried this could permanently shrink aquifers.

http://www.livescience.com/51943-california-sinking-faster-than-thought.html

This could damage infrastructure not to mention I would worry about the ground caving in especially if they have an earthquake.

Thoughts?
 

Dr4gon

Registered Member
V.I.P.
Or even massive sinkholes. And if bridges and roads can crack then buildings and stuff could crack too. They have epic issues but what can they do? Also Im wondering if the sinking could start a massive earthquake like the one that hit Japan.
Well with the drought it will only get even worse. Time to find somewhere else to go for the holidays.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I couldn't believe how fast it was sinking. Have to wonder if they have a large earthquake if some of this land that is sinking will cave in. That in itself could cause even a bigger earthquake. I wouldn't want to live there. In places its a few dozen feet below what it was in 1925.

It primarily affects farmland since farmers use about 80 percent of the state’s water although, historically, cities such as San Jose and San Luis Obispo have experienced costly subsidence, too. Back in the 1960s, California farmland in the Central Valley was sinking at a record pace. By the late 1970s, some areas had sunk about 30 feet. It cost the state more than $1 billion to fix just some of the damage, which included sinking bridges, cracking canals and buckling highways, according to one estimate. The sinking took off again in 2008, and farmland now is dropping at a record pace. At least one agricultural area in the Central Valley is on pace to sink 30 feet – the equivalent of a three-story building – by 2030.
https://www.revealnews.org/article/9-sobering-facts-about-californias-groundwater-problem/

I'm wondering if it does start raining a lot again will we see some lakes form.
 

Rapier

Well-Known Member
V.I.P.
Plenty of water up North. What are they waiting for?
 

Dr4gon

Registered Member
V.I.P.
Oklahoma only has manmade lakes so maybe thats what California should do.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
Unless their rain situation changes I don't think building a lake would do any good.
 
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