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Butter in your coffee

The_Chameleon

Grandmaster
I would, but I only haz margerine and I don't think that'd be the same. :)
Next time I get the opportunity though I'll check out what all da fuss is about.


- Cham
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
No margarine won't work. That stuff won't melt very well and it wouldn't taste very good.
 

Dr4gon

Registered Member
V.I.P.
Huh? The article in the OP said a "high fat" diet. Winter butter has a lot higher fat than summer (grass fed) butter. That's why it's harder and better for baking. I know a lot about cooking btw.

K. So I tried it with winter butter. Not good. I forgot that winter butter doesnt melt very easy.
But hey it was still really good and I used home roasted Kenya coffee beans and the coconut oil.
Tomorrow I will try it with summer butter. That should blend a lot easier.

EDIT:

The summer butter does work better and tastes better.
But dont forget that stuff baked with winter butter tastes better than stuff baked with summer butter. Breads too.
So basically its summer (grass fed) butter for low temp stuff but winter (hay fed) butter for high temp stuff.
Btw summer butter = more yellow and softer. Also it can be frozen and used in the winter.
Winter butter is pale and hard.
 
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Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
I wonder if its because green grass has more chlorophyll in it than hay and in the winter a lot of these animals are fed grains.
 

Dr4gon

Registered Member
V.I.P.
I wonder if its because green grass has more chlorophyll in it than hay and in the winter a lot of these animals are fed grains.
Thats a huge "Yes". :) Butter gets its color from the carotene and chlorophyll but the grass doesnt have as much fat as grains and maize. And since fat is more rigid and crystallizes easily then the butter is harder and it only melts at higher temps.
Its a lot like amylose and starch in different potatoes. Thats why high starch/amylose potatoes (white) are better for baking and boiling but low starch/amylose potatoes (red skinned) keep their shape and are better for stews and casseroles. Yukon gold is in between.
I learned a lot about that when I learned how to make crispy hash browns. :D
 
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