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Brawling at Chuck E. Cheese

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...t-at-florida-chuck-e-cheeses-caught-on-video/

I don't understand parents taking their kids to a birthday party then getting into a fight. You would think they would have enough sense to realize if one of them falls on a child they could kill them. I have to wonder why brawls happen so often at Chuck E. Cheese. You expect a brawl at a bar from time to time but not a family restaurant. People are becoming loony.

Thoughts?
 

Impaired

Registered Member
I am not surprised. The issue, to my old school mind, is parenting.

The lack of it. People don't want to be parents. They don't want to discipline their kids and raise them properly. They are mad because the schools are not teaching their kids to behave.

These 'parents', which is not the right term, the sperm and egg donors are generally people with no discipline who spoil their children and teach them to grow up and be entitled little monsters.

I'm over 50 and raised 2 children, 11 years apart. The changes between daughter 1 and daughter 2 were staggering.

9 year old girls going to school in see through lace shirts and mini-skirts. 9 year old boys at my house, asking me who I was to tell them what to do. They were not invited back. I don't tolerate rude behavior.

Parents telling me I am mean and cruel, because I made my daughters work if they wanted things. I didn't give them cell phones and tablets. They had chores they had to do, that they were not paid for as part of living in my house.

If they wanted money, they could ask for extra work. My mother in law, the only one within 1000 miles, did the same with my kids - gave them chores and gave them lots of chances to make money, if they didn't mind working. Some friends also go it on it and the kids would work together, like yard work, painting, extra cleaning jobs (what house with kids doesn't have them?)

It caused issues, even with my wife who is not a disciplinarian and often fought against me. I'm stubborn and it was one thing i never backed off from.

My youngest, at 17, after being caught lying about where she was going was grounded. She snuck out the window with a bag and ran to her mom's (married in Spain in the USAF to a woman who started asking for a divorce around the same time she was legally established here) - she lived there her last year of high school. We barely spoke outside of family gatherings until she was 22 and realized that I was the one on her side. Even when it seemed like I was not.

My other daughter bitterly complained about "my overbearing, military father" which is funny, as I am not very military in my bearing. What I am is stubborn and on some subjects, I will not be moved.

With her it was about 18 months at the end of high school when she said she hated me and that I ruined her life with my rules.

I am very happy to say that both of my daughters have since thanked me for saying "NO!" and being rough, because the lessons made sense to them finally. Our family is very tight and I love that BOTH my daughters want to have their parties at my house. Now that they are on their own, we can be friends - in a way we could not when they were children. My wife wanted to be the youngest's friend and did that which was hard, as it made her the good guy and me the bad guy. I was the only one who said no.

I wanted to be their friend, but I was sure that being a good parent came first. That means setting rules and enforcing them almost ruthlessly. If you don't enforce your rules, don't have them. An unenforced rule (or law) makes every other law weaker.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
Not saying you were Impaired but I had a neighbor that was really tough on her kids, really rammed religion down their throats, real restrictive on what they could do or read, when the two boys left home they went wild. I think one is using some hard drugs now, really not sure about the other one. The daughter turned out okay.

I think the biggest problem with Chuck E. Cheese is the parents not the kids. Since they are willing to fight at their kids birthday party probably not much when it come to parenting either.
 

Impaired

Registered Member
Not saying you were Impaired but I had a neighbor that was really tough on her kids, really rammed religion down their throats, real restrictive on what they could do or read, when the two boys left home they went wild. I think one is using some hard drugs now, really not sure about the other one. The daughter turned out okay.

I think the biggest problem with Chuck E. Cheese is the parents not the kids. Since they are willing to fight at their kids birthday party probably not much when it come to parenting either.
That's not what I mean about being tough.

It isn't about ramming ideals down their throats. It is about setting limits and enforcing them, even when you don't want to - it is about saying no, even when you really want to give in.

If you hand a child everything, never make them work for anything, the tend to not appreciate anything. The don't know the value of getting a return on hard work.

I didn't stop my kids from reading anything, or listening to anything. I did stress the importance of following rules set by other parents or teachers. Their parents don't allow horror, in their house, you obey that rule. At school, X music is not allowed - don't play it.

I did my level best not to make my person political beliefs color them. I don't care who they vote for - I just care that they vote. Both my daughters do and asked to vote as soon as possible because I made that important.

Brainwashing is not the goal. I wasn't trying to raise kids of a certain religion, one was baptized Catholic and one Lutheran and I am not Christian. Never had any religious beliefs to speak of - I'll find out when I am dead. If being a good person isn't enough then heaven is a place I don't want to be.

Being a parent means saying "no" - a lot. You don't have to beat them. If you are doing your job right, they do not want to disappoint you. The look in your eyes is punishment enough at that point.
 

Hilander

Free Spirit
Staff member
V.I.P.
That's not what I mean about being tough.

It isn't about ramming ideals down their throats. It is about setting limits and enforcing them, even when you don't want to - it is about saying no, even when you really want to give in.

If you hand a child everything, never make them work for anything, the tend to not appreciate anything. The don't know the value of getting a return on hard work.

I didn't stop my kids from reading anything, or listening to anything. I did stress the importance of following rules set by other parents or teachers. Their parents don't allow horror, in their house, you obey that rule. At school, X music is not allowed - don't play it.

I did my level best not to make my person political beliefs color them. I don't care who they vote for - I just care that they vote. Both my daughters do and asked to vote as soon as possible because I made that important.

Brainwashing is not the goal. I wasn't trying to raise kids of a certain religion, one was baptized Catholic and one Lutheran and I am not Christian. Never had any religious beliefs to speak of - I'll find out when I am dead. If being a good person isn't enough then heaven is a place I don't want to be.

Being a parent means saying "no" - a lot. You don't have to beat them. If you are doing your job right, they do not want to disappoint you. The look in your eyes is punishment enough at that point.
I didn't think you were I was just pointing out what going overboard with it can do. Sounds like to me you did a good job.

Her kids weren't given the room to learn anything for themselves or make decisions for themselves so when they left home they just kind of went wild. I remember some comic books my son had. When she thought her kids were going to read them she lost it. Said they were satanic. They were just comic books, nothing satanic about them. Nothing against religion but she was over the top religious.
 

Impaired

Registered Member
Some of it it is luck. Some kids are difficult, some are not. My oldest was a troublemaker, the youngest a dram queen. Thankfully, these were teen aged phases.
 

Dr4gon

Registered Member
V.I.P.
K. So maybe build small arenas and sell popcorn? They could even sponsor a parent fight night and charge admission.
Parenting in the US is so... different.
 
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