Borderline Personality Disorder

  • Thread starter lil_red_riding_hood
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lil_red_riding_hood

Guest
#1
I got diagnosed with BPD when I was 15, shortly after my rape. Me, my mother, and my therapist watched a video on it and at the time I thought it sounded like every teenage girl I knew. It actually sounded like every female I'd ever known. That's because I hadn't really educated myself on it. To me it sort of sounds like Bipolar Disorder (something I don't have, my doctor and therapist swear up and down I only have BPD) so I wondered if anyone knew the difference. I mean, there are obvious traits and differences that I have, like promiscuity, difficulty controlling my anger, and substance abuse/dependence, but they seem so close in ideals to Bipolar Disorder. I mean, some therapists don't even like the term Borderline Personality because it implies something different from what the disease actually is... IDK, comments. It's something that has really interested me, and I'm not ashamed of it at all, it's just me, but it's interesting. I mean, to an extent don't you think everyone is a little "crazy" for lack of a better term?

If you don't know what BPD I will post a link. It's not as bad as it sounds, it's not like I have three lil_reds running around inside me or something...

http://www.bpdcentral.com/resources/basics/main.shtml
 
#2
I'd prolly be diagnosed with BPD.

It would be interesting if three Reds were running around tho...if they were anything like what you are that is!
 
L

lil_red_riding_hood

Guest
#3
I'd prolly be diagnosed with BPD.

It would be interesting if three Reds were running around tho...if they were anything like what you are that is!
Yeah, that's scary. Hey, I guess no one is interested in this topic... Damn it, I busted!
 

Kazmarov

For a Free Scotland
#4
It seems to be not the same as bipolar disorder, but simply a more specific variation. There are several characteristics (such as a preference for absolutes in thinking) that don't necessarily have to be part of bipolar disorder: being bipolar is a very vauge and overarching condition.

I have a mild maniac-depressive condition (hint: I take way weaker stuff than Zoloft), and I generally suck at relationships, I don't think I quite fit it.
 
L

lil_red_riding_hood

Guest
#5
It seems to be not the same as bipolar disorder, but simply a more specific variation. There are several characteristics (such as a preference for absolutes in thinking) that don't necessarily have to be part of bipolar disorder: being bipolar is a very vauge and overarching condition.

I have a mild maniac-depressive condition (hint: I take way weaker stuff than Zoloft), and I generally suck at relationships, I don't think I quite fit it.
It's most definitely connected to Bipolar, and I think men are diagnosed with Bipolar and women are diagnosed with BPD b/c BPD are somehow more emotional and Freudians consider Bipolar easier for men to deal with than a characterized "woman's disease".
 
Y

Yukon

Guest
#6
Move this Thread to Flaming and Complaining and I'll respond.

Thanks,
Yukon
 
#7
It's most definitely connected to Bipolar, and I think men are diagnosed with Bipolar and women are diagnosed with BPD b/c BPD are somehow more emotional and Freudians consider Bipolar easier for men to deal with than a characterized "woman's disease".

Nope thats not true Red. Bipolar is very much defined and it is Borderline Personality Disorder that can camoflage itself in with other psychiatric disorders. Here is the DSM-4's criteria for Bipolar Disorder.

From my psychiatric nursing book by Norman L. Keltner, et al.

I. Manic Episode
A. A distinct period of abnormal and persistent elevated, expansive, or irritable mood that lasts at least 1 week
B. At least 3 of the following symptoms must occure during the episode ( or four if the patient is only irritable:
  1. Inflated selr-esteem or grandiosity
  2. Decreased need for sleep
  3. Very talkative
  4. Flight of ideas or subjective feelin that thoughts are racing
  5. Distractibility
  6. Increase in goal-directed activity( social, occupational, educational, or sexual) or psycomotor agitation
  7. Excessive involvement in pleasurable activities that have a high potential for personal problems (e.g. sexual promiscuity, spending sprees, bad business investments)
C. Mood disturbance severe enough to cause problems socially, interpersonally, or at work, or the person has to be hospitalized to prevent harm to self or others
D. Not due to a substance

II. Hypomanic episode: The person experiencing a hypomanic episode meets most of the criteria for manic episode, with two major exceptions: the syptoms must be present "only" 4 days and the person must manifest an unequivocal change in functioning that is observable by others. A hypomanic episode is not significant impairment or to require hospitalization

III. Bipolar disorders
A. Bipolar episodes are divided into bipolar I and bipolar II. There are six categories of bipolar I. In bipolar I, the patient must have a history of a manic episode.
B. Bipolar II: The patient has experienced major depression and a hypomanic episode (but not a manic episode)

IV. Cyclothymic disorder: For a period of 2 years, the patient has had numerous periods of hypomanic symptoms and numerous periods of a depressed mood. The patient is never symptom free for more than 2 months at a time. The patient has never experienced major depression.


and the DSM-4 criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder:

Criteria for a Borderline Personality Disorder
  1. Frantic avoidance of abandonment, real or imagined
  2. Unstanble and intense interpersonal relationships
  3. Identity disturbances
  4. Impulsivity
  5. Affective instability
  6. Recurrent suicidal behaviour or self-mutilating
  7. Rapid mood shifts
  8. Chronic feelings of emptiness
  9. Problems with anger
  10. Transient dissociative and paranoid symptoms
Now what I am trying to say by posting all this is that people can be diagnosed with both. You can be Bipolar and Borderline.

One is a mood disorder.. the other is a personality disorder and hell truth be told someone can be Depressed and Borderline. Some one can be suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and be Borderline.

It effects another part of the mental spectrum, in the aspect of what I had learned from school.

If you need anything more answered just write and I will see what I can do!
 
#8
I think I am right in asserting that everyone is to a degree bipolar until they are around 22 .. our brain isn't fully grown until we are in our early twenties .. thus our brains cannot make decisions effectively until our brain is finished growing ..

Far to many young people are sucked into mental heath medication & treatment unnecessarily .. when in reality all thats going on is growth .. growing pains ..

Its perfectly natural for a teen to have mood swings & suffer bouts of neurotic & schizoid phases .. all thats happening is the brain is bouncing off the walls getting its bearings ..

The brain actually doesn't stop growing after 22 its just the process becomes standardized .. every seven years your brain reinvents itself after the leveling off of physical development .. the brain never stops changing & reevaluating ..

Neuroscience is coo-el ..