Bob Gibson

Discussion in 'Baseball' started by StroShow, Aug 30, 2007.

  1. StroShow

    StroShow The return shall be legenday! V.I.P. Lifetime

    This guy was the real deal. From 1963-1970 he won 156 games and only lost 81, he won nine GoldGloves during is illustrious career, was awarded Wold Series MVP twice once in 1964, and the other in 1967, and also won two Cy Young Awards once in 1968 and the other in 1970. One of is most clutch career moments happened during the 1967 World Series where he only surrendered 3 earned runs during 3 complete games. The crazy thing that season is that he broke is leg from a line drive by Roberto Clemente. He had a lot of accomplishments during his career. But a thing I heard about this guy was that his fastball was so fast he could pitch it through a brick wall. I'm not sure if that statement was accurate or not. But if it was that's insane.
     

  2. soberdennis

    soberdennis Guest

    I have always wondered how in the world he lost 9 games with an ERA of 1.12 in 1968.
    The guy was amazing. He was one of the best pitchers in an era that had Koufax, Ford, and Marichal.
     
  3. SHOELESSJOE3

    SHOELESSJOE3 Registered Member

    Bob played the game the way it should be played, hard ball. I recall Reggie Jackson telling of a time he hit a home run off of Gibson either an All Star game or exhibition game. He said as he ran the bases he never looked over to Bob because he thought that if Bob thought he ( Reggie) was showing him up in the next at bat he might get one under the chin.

    A funny story told by an former Dodger player, I think it was Wes Parker. The Dodgers were facing Gibson in one game when a fairly new Dodger (don't recall his name) came to bat against Gibson. Gibson was annoyed at the hitter as he took all his time digging his spikes into the dirt trying to get comfortable. It was then that Gibson yelled to the batter, "You better dig a little deeper." The young hitter now rattled stepped further back from the plate and was struck out by Gibson.
     

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