• Welcome to the PopMalt Forums! Whether you're new to forums or a veteran, welcome to our humble home on the web! We're a 20-year old forum community with thousands of discussions on entertainment, lifestyle, leisure, and more.

    Our rules are simple. Be nice and don't spam. Registration is free, so what are you waiting for? Join today!.

Best Canadian Players in MLB History

BJBirdy

Registered Member
I think the obvious question to who the best Canadian player of all-time is Fergie Jenkins, but who would you rank #2-5? There's some good choices, you have the likes of Larry Walker, (a prime) Jason Bay, Matt Stairs, John Axford, and Eric Gagne. Who do you rank #2 behind Jenkins?
 

StroShow

The return shall be legenday!
V.I.P.
Of course #1 is Fergie. The most underrated pitcher of his day, 1 Cy Young, won with some bad teams and can someone please tell me why his 31 is NOT retired by the Cubs when he went into the Hall as a Cub? I would even put him ahead of Nolan Ryan in the top pitching category. 2-5?!? Here's how I would put it:

Larry Walker
Justin Morneau
Joey Votto
Matt Stairs

Hope to see Lawrie step up his game and make my lists some day.
 

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
Joey Votto has a chance to become first or second by the time he retires. Just needs to stay relatively healthy.

He's 30-years old and his career slash line is pretty impressive: .310/.417/.533

Now, he's having a terrible season, but he's only played in 62 games. It would be hard for him to surpass Larry Walker's numbers, but there's a strong possibility that he'll finish up with better overall numbers than him.

Also, even though he's having a good season this year, it's sad that it took Morneau so long to recover from his concussion - which also derailed his career. He was on his way to Larry Walker type of numbers.

But, the clear cut number one is Fergie Jenkins.
 

Millz

Better Call Saul
Staff member
V.I.P.
The best Canadian player I've seen with my own eyes was Larry Walker. He had some inflated numbers in Denver but was still excellent in Montreal and St Louis.
 

BJBirdy

Registered Member
The StroShow said:
Of course #1 is Fergie. The most underrated pitcher of his day, 1 Cy Young, won with some bad teams and can someone please tell me why his 31 is NOT retired by the Cubs when he went into the Hall as a Cub? I would even put him ahead of Nolan Ryan in the top pitching category. 2-5?!? Here's how I would put it:
It is retired...

My 2-5 would be:

2 - Justin Morneau
3 - Joey Votto
4 - Larry Walker
5 - Matt Stairs

Honorable mentions to Eric Gagne and Stubby Clapp.
 

StroShow

The return shall be legenday!
V.I.P.
BJBirdy said:
The StroShow said:
Of course #1 is Fergie. The most underrated pitcher of his day, 1 Cy Young, won with some bad teams and can someone please tell me why his 31 is NOT retired by the Cubs when he went into the Hall as a Cub? I would even put him ahead of Nolan Ryan in the top pitching category. 2-5?!? Here's how I would put it:
It is retired...

My 2-5 would be:

2 - Justin Morneau
3 - Joey Votto
4 - Larry Walker
5 - Matt Stairs

Honorable mentions to Eric Gagne and Stubby Clapp.
Completely slipped my mind! I should've checked his Wiki page before I opened my big mouth. In my defense, it happened back in 2009.
 
Jenkins was good. But if you ask me, he comes in a distant second to the best Canadian player of all time... Napoléon Lajoie. Now I know Lajoie was born in Woonsocket R.I. but hear me out. We know that his dad, and probably his mother as well, were french-canadian migrants who participated in the great exodus to the US of 1840-1930. So, had there been a canadian citizenship back then, Lajoie would have been a Canadian citizen despite being born on US soil. And I'd go a bit further. French-canadians who emigrated to the states back then, especially in a place like Woonsocket where you had such an important canadian population, tended to congregate in neighborhoods called "Little Canadas", because life so closely ressembled life in the St-Lawrence Valley (they even had their own institutions - schools, churches, hospitals, newspapers, etc.) So, I don't know the specifics of Lajoie's youth, but he probably had virtually no contact with American culture, or even with the english language, before he was 8-9 years old. He was a Canadian living on American soil.

And his stats are quite impressive. I know those were different times, but the man had a BA over ,375 five times in his career. 107 career WAR, he's 7th all-time in doubles, 14th in hits, and he still holds, and will probably hold until the end of times, the record for best BA in a season in the AL (,426). Best Canadian ever.
 
BTW, isn't there any love for James Edward "Tip" O'Neal in your lists? His career was short, I know. But he deserves consideration, if nothing else, for his 1887 season, when he led the American Association in runs, hits, 2B, 3B, HR, RBI, BA, OBP, OPS, OPS+ and TB. Almost a clean sweep!
 
Top