Australia to censor Internet, Republic of China applauds

Discussion in 'Politics & Law' started by Nevyrmoore, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. Nevyrmoore

    Nevyrmoore AKA Ass-Bandit

    Internet Censorship Plan Approved In Australia | Stephen Conroy

    Well that doesn't seem so bad, now does it? Only, there is a problem...

    So basically, the Australian government is going to have full control over a blacklist only they can alter, and they can add any website they want to the list, regardless of what the rest of Australia thinks.

    So Aussies, I hear America's pretty good, ever considered moving...?
     

  2. icegoat63

    icegoat63 Son of Liberty V.I.P. Lifetime

    That is some nasty shit.

    I'm not on the up and up with the Australian Government... but dont you guys get some sort of Say on this? like a Vote? Or is it just a type of Government that says "Hey Citizens.... Bend over :mischievous:"
     
  3. Shooting_Palanx

    Shooting_Palanx The Rock is cooking atm..

    AWWWW MAN!!!!!!

    This is going to suck monkey balls!

    I can understand why they're doing this, but good god I hope all the normal sites don't get blocked over this.
     
  4. pro2A

    pro2A Hell, It's about time!

    Gotta love it when government can wield the power of the state over something they don't like. This is just the foundation for further infringements.
     
  5. Merc

    Merc Certified Shitlord V.I.P. Lifetime

    I don't know about the rest of you, but my first thoughts were after reading the thread title, "If China is applauding you, you know you've done something wrong."
     
  6. ExpectantlyIronic

    ExpectantlyIronic e̳̳̺͕ͬ̓̑̂ͮͦͣ͒͒h̙ͦ̔͂?̅̂ ̾͗̑

    Australia has had a piss-poor track record lately when it comes to issues of free speech. Who would have ever thought that Australia of all places would be so prudish?
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2009
  7. Xeilo

    Xeilo Registered Member V.I.P. Lifetime

    This has been a something that comes up in the news every now and then, I think it is bloody ridiculous, if they end up doing it there will be a huge uproar over it. Its gonna be fun seeing all the "This site has been blacklisted by the Australian Government" popping up all the time.... not.
     
  8. pro2A

    pro2A Hell, It's about time!

    Maybe its just me, but I don't think other first world nations have the 1st Amendment. Someone from Australia can chime in here, but it's my understanding that there are charters in most countries that are considered the "Free World". These charters are created by government stating what rights the citizens have. Correct me if I am wrong, but a government that can give you what you want can also take it away :shake:

    The first Amendment of the U.S. Constitution tells the government what they can't do, not the government telling it's citizens what rights they have (then taking them away because they don't like it anymore). Thus why the US government can't legally censor the internet, but the Australian government can.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2009
  9. Charlatan

    Charlatan New Member

    To blacklist sites means that people won't have access to them, which is good and bad. It is good because influence breeds actions, and it is bad because of, well, actually I can;t think of anything bad about it.

    The state is the parent, the people are the children. The state is there to protect the people from the 'evils' of the world and had done so. If someone sees something it becomes part of their lives, so, if they see someone worshipping the devil over the corpse of a dead cat, then it enters their mind and becomes a possibility. If there is no source there can be no reaction. A world without drugs is a drug free world.
     
  10. Nevyrmoore

    Nevyrmoore AKA Ass-Bandit

    No, the state is there to make sure shit keeps running. We, as fully functioning adults able to determine what we want to see, are more than capable of taking care of ourselves. We don't need the government telling us how we should live our lives.

    Unless you're perfectly fine with George Orwell's 'Nineteen Eighty-Four'.
     

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