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An end to racism and prejudice?

SmilinSilhouette

Registered Member
Wouldn't that be great! QB posed this question which I think is a good one:
I'd be really interested to know what those of you who argue that focusing on racism is the problem suggest can be done to actually eradicate racism. We're not supposed to focus on it or talk about it, we're supposed to ignore the fact that people of color continue to face intense discrimination in matters such as education, housing, employment, and public services, yet we're supposed to howl every time some White person claims discrimination by a person of color. Racism of any kind is wrong, yet does anyone here really believe that Whites are discriminated against just as much as are people of color? Do people really believe that a White persona and a person of color born into the US face the same obstacles and are offered the same opportunities? I am willing to talk about false claims of racism made by people of color and how detrimental that is to cultural cohesiveness, but not without looking at the entire picture. People do not like these conversations, as they make them uncomfortable and defensive, but I will not shy away from pointing out that the US remains deeply and tragically divided by race and that it isn't talking about it that's the problem--it's denying racism's existence and pretending that all things are equal that is shamefully, woefully ineffective for truly fostering unity across all races.
Now ^ that is a question!

First, allow me to clarify and reframe the question.

I don't believe the focus on racism is a problem, but the use of the accusation of racism to discredit others with little actual basis exacerbates the race problem.

As we all know, we will never eradicate racism. So our best hope is to continue to minimize the impact of racism.

I feel we can even address this topic as the overarching problem of prejudice. Racism is just one of it's many forms. So maybe we can talk about it in those terms.

To get things rolling I will offer my suggestion of how to improve the situation and invite others to do the same.

The simple truth is that you can not solve the problem of prejudice by using more prejudice! For example, the use of race to inflict disadvantage is the same as using it to give advantage. So to use it to qualify or disqualify an individual is prejudice. Whether it is used to determine who is promoted, allowed in, or any other advantage/disadvantage is simply wrong. This is especially important when it comes to correcting past wrongs. Two wrongs can not make a right. So let's all reject that technique whenever it is used. That includes such things as "affirmative action". Use of preferential systems further ingrains the use of preferences (prejudice) as a legitimate technique/solution. IMO That just makes it an even more difficult problem to solve.

I'll leave it at that for now and see where it takes us.
 

fractal

Eye see what you did ther
Your suggestion seems to be heading towards colour blind racism. Anyway, what do you mean by preference towards a race? Are you talking about psychological preference, or something more concrete?

There's no foolproof solution to the problem of racism. Racism is an attitude, and this attitude might be slowly corrected by the use of anti-racism messages and shunning racism when it happens. In other words, by leaving things as they are.
 

SmilinSilhouette

Registered Member
Your suggestion seems to be heading towards colour blind racism.
I don't understand, what do you mean by color blind racism?

Anyway, what do you mean by preference towards a race? Are you talking about psychological preference, or something more concrete?
In the US we have: Affirmative action - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


There's no foolproof solution to the problem of racism. Racism is an attitude, and this attitude might be slowly corrected by the use of anti-racism messages and shunning racism when it happens. In other words, by leaving things as they are.
Yes, I agree! racism will not end in our lifetime. But we can minimize the effect and appeal. I think messages of anti-racism can only be effective if there is an underlying moral superiority. For example if you reject racism then you can't use it to implement a solution in the form of reverse discrimination to correct past discrimination. It only perpetuates discrimination. Shunning, I think, can be a very effective tool. If you reject prejudice and discrimination, discourage it on a personal level, and choose to disassociate yourself with those that practice it then an environment can be created where that behavior is at least not rewarded and possibly discouraged.

Rejecting discrimination on a political level would be a good start.
 
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fractal

Eye see what you did ther
I don't understand, what do you mean by color blind racism?
Indirect racism by pretending racial issues don't matter.
https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Color_blindness_(race)
In India, we call them 'reservations', and if you try to reduce the percentage of reservations, there will be violent protests. This is a huge problem that's a waste of social resources. Censuses taken years ago are being used to justify aid to 'backward castes', even though they are no longer reflective of the current economic statuses.

Rejecting discrimination on a political level would be a good start.
I think rejecting discrimination at the school level would be a better start. Racism is an ingrained problem in the current generation, but if the literature school children are exposed to contain is a mixture of people from different races, it may prevent the racist mentality from passing on to the next generation. As an example, modern literature alternatively uses 'her' instead of 'his' etc. to make it more gender fair. A similar approach might be used for races where stories include people from many different countries acting together. Films that introduce the people and traditions from other countries might be introduced in schools at an early age, for holistic learning and a casual acceptance of other races.
 
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BigBob

Registered Member
I think rejecting discrimination at the school level would be a better start. Racism is an ingrained problem in the current generation, but if the literature school children are exposed to contain is a mixture of people from different races, it may prevent the racist mentality from passing on to the next generation. As an example, modern literature alternatively uses 'her' instead of 'his' etc. to make it more gender fair. A similar approach might be used for races where stories include people from many different countries acting together. Films that introduce the people and traditions from other countries might be introduced in schools at an early age, for holistic learning and a casual acceptance of other races.
Are you living in the past? That's not a huge issue here in America anymore. If a school tries to do that here, they would be in a heap of shit because a "group" like the NAACP wouldn't let them get away with it. They'd bring so much negative attention to the school that they would almost have to fold and prove they aren't doing it.

I don't want to get too much into the topic of "Affirmative Action" because I'm one of those people who do call it "Affirmative Blackaction". Giving an unfair advantage to a race because of previous years where they didn't have rights? Sooner or later, white people are going to need something so we can get a job that we are more qualified for. Am I saying black people or other races aren't qualified for the jobs? No. But there's many times where because someone is black, because of "Affirmative Action" that they get the job over a better qualified person. This is also in sports where teams HAVE to interview a black person for a job opening or else they could face fines.

Why "stop" racism by creating more racism? That's what I believe the OP is getting to, and it's true. It's wrong.
 

SmilinSilhouette

Registered Member
Right BB, how did we ever let it happen that institutionalized racism and sexism would be used to combat racism and sexism?

But I'm not just interested in replies about my idea, I wonder what others think we can do to minimize the negative impacts of prejudice.
 

BigBob

Registered Member
Right BB, how did we ever let it happen that institutionalized racism and sexism would be used to combat racism and sexism?

But I'm not just interested in replies about my idea, I wonder what others think we can do to minimize the negative impacts of prejudice.
Well the thing is, as long as there are rules and laws in place that give a certain group of people an unfair advantage, there's not very much that will minimize the negative impacts. This is all thanks to the NAACP. Getting rid of "Affirmative Action", which would be a big first step of minimizing "racism" and "prejudice", but that would mean we're racist for wanting to give white people an equal chance to get the job they are qualified for.
 

SmilinSilhouette

Registered Member
Well the thing is, as long as there are rules and laws in place that give a certain group of people an unfair advantage, there's not very much that will minimize the negative impacts. This is all thanks to the NAACP. Getting rid of "Affirmative Action", which would be a big first step of minimizing "racism" and "prejudice", but that would mean we're racist for wanting to give white people an equal chance to get the job they are qualified for.
Hahaha, I know what you mean. But we have to reject the false claim of racism and turn it back on those that are the true racists: those that support institutionalized prejudice.

And I agree, it will be impossible to reject racism while embracing racism.
 

fractal

Eye see what you did ther
Why "stop" racism by creating more racism? That's what I believe the OP is getting to, and it's true. It's wrong.
I was advocating exposure, not preference.
 
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BigBob

Registered Member
The part of my post that you quoted had NOTHING TO DO WITH WHAT YOU SAID, because I wasn't commenting on your post with that comment.
 
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