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9 year old, screaming at his mom for choco milk on Xbox Live

yooperchick

Registered Member
Andrew said:
The kid needs to know that if he or she doesn't obey, then they will face whatever consequences apply.
When I was growing up, if I did something bad, all my mom would have to say is "Wait until your dad comes home" and I would run to my room crying hoping I could somehow get off the hook. I learned real quick what was right and wrong.

Key element here - FEAR. I feared my father. I never got a spanking, cause overall I was a good kid. But the fear was there. And, as a result, I repected him and my mom.

Kids that I see now causing trouble don't seem to fear anyone or any consequences.
 

NewGamePlus

Registered Member
Andrew said:
Parents shouldn't have to explain their every move and decision to their kids. The kid needs to know that if he or she doesn't obey, then they will face whatever consequences apply. If the kid's mom says to turn off the XBOX, and he didn't do it, she shouldn't have to sit down with him and explain why he has to turn it off. He has to turn it off simply because he was just told to by his mom, who is his legal guardian.
Certainly kids shouldn't be expected to obey blindly if their parent(s) say to walk off a cliff (general statement)
You just made one fat ass contractiction. What you first described was blind trust. Then you basically said that kids shouldn't have that. But there's nothing separating the second part from fitting right into the first part. So if the first part is true, then a kid may very well be "walking off a cliff" if a kid goes along with it. You can't just single out the most "obviously bad" of parental orders as the ones that should be questioned. If one should be questioned or disobeyed, then they are ALL subject to being questioned and disobeyed, because they can ALL be good or bad to varying degrees.

There's no sense in the kids repeating the same ignorances as the parents and we all know that not all parents are perfect (the vast majority in fact) so if a kid honestly wants answers, then he's entitled to that from his parents. The fact that they're his parents MAKES NO DIFFERENCE. They are just two other people all the same. As far as I'm concerned, if the parents aren't explaining, then they simply arent' trying. So any resistance they get from the kid is fully deserved.

but when it comes to matters like this
matters like what? are you fitting this case into a generalization that I'm not aware of? sounds like it. No matter is to small to be influential in a kid's life.

I see no reason for his mother to have to sit down and explain why she wants him to turn it down, turn it off, or why she's not jumping at his screaming and cursing for her to bring him chocolate milk.
Who said that? All I suggested was that she show maybe just the slightest bit of heart in her relationship with the kid by going right upto him and arguing to his face rather taking the cheap dipshit way out of yelling it from another room. Maybe then she could actually HEAR her childs concerns, SEE how important (or non important) the game is, and she could therefore make a more reasonable argument and decision in the first place.
 

NewGamePlus

Registered Member
madgamer said:
When I was growing up, if I did something bad, all my mom would have to say is "Wait until your dad comes home" and I would run to my room crying hoping I could somehow get off the hook. I learned real quick what was right and wrong.
No, actually you didn't (according to the little you told). You learned absolutley NOTHING about what was "right and wrong". What you learned was what your parents were willing to punish you for. If they were willing to punish you for volunteering at the soup kitchen at your local church on sunday, then your brain would have registered THAT as "wrong" too, based on the system you described.
 

yooperchick

Registered Member
But they DIDN'T punish me for volunteering at a soup kitchen. Why would they given the system that I described? I have a very good sense of right and wrong. I know that there are consequences for my actions and if I choose to do "wrong" things, I have to be prepared to take the heat for it. They did a very good job with me regarding that and it has made me a good citizen.

I guess I should also add that my parents were also very supportive in everything that wasn't "wrong" that I decided to do with my life. They have always provided unconditional support for my decisions, even if they didn't like what I was choosing to do (but it wasn't necessarily "wrong"). Like moving where I live today. They weren't happy I was moving so far away, but they supported me in my decision.
 

NewGamePlus

Registered Member
madgamer said:
But they DIDN'T punish me for volunteering at a soup kitchen. Why would they given the system that I described
You don't get it. It's because the system you described would make no distinction ruling that out. The system you described makes right and wrong completely arbitrary because it's not about knowing, understanding, and doing what's right or wrong. It's about avoiding punishment from the parents, which may or may not include understanding what's really right and wrong.

I have a very good sense of right and wrong. I know that there are consequences for my actions and if I choose to do "wrong" things, I have to be prepared to take the heat for it. They did a very good job with me regarding that and it has made me a good citizen.
So your parents turned out to be good. But there are also many parents out there [using that exact SAME system] who would be bad, producing kids that would turn out to be bad. That's my point.
 

yooperchick

Registered Member
I wouldn't say my parent's were "good." Actually I have had a messed up family life and but luckily was spared much of it because I was the youngest in the family. My older siblings got most of the madness. But some of their parenting skills I am thankful for.

I do see your point Vega about the "right" or "wrong" distinction. Maybe the reason it worked with me is that I then would reflect on why I was getting punishment (or the threat of) and then figured out for myself what was right or wrong if my mom didn't happen to tell me first.
 

Gamechamp

Registered Member
You know, even though the kid said he was in a Clan Match, doesn't mean he was. Maybe he was lying and was just doing small custom game. That would explain it, because if it's a clan match it would probably sound more important to his mom.
 

NewGamePlus

Registered Member
Well his mom isn't going to know that unless she comes in the room and takes a look at it for herself, which she didn't do here.

I think the kid may have been "lying" in the since that he was actually "practicing with the clan" not having a clan match. That would have made it harder for him to make the case that it was important for him to stay there and finish it.
 

Mirage

Secret Agent
Staff member
V.I.P.
XBOX: $200

XBOX LIVE: $50

Rainbow Six 3: Black Arrow: $40

Acting like an idiot while one of your so called clan-mates records the whole thing, and then puts it on the internet... funny, but doesn't quite take the cake yet...

Having 2 pages of people debating your every move during this possible prank video. PRICELESS! :D
 

NewGamePlus

Registered Member
Well it's better that we debate over his every move and actually learn something about how to make the human race better instead of just generalizing about it saying "kids are crap, people suck, I hate existance, we should assume everyone's bad and punish them all" and going on to make nothing but more and more jack sh*t of this world.

I'll take that option any day.
 
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