• Welcome to the PopMalt Forums! Whether you're new to forums or a veteran, welcome to our humble home on the web! We're a 20-year old forum community with thousands of discussions on entertainment, lifestyle, leisure, and more.

    Our rules are simple. Be nice and don't spam. Registration is free, so what are you waiting for? Join today!.

56 game hitting streak vs. .406 batting average

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
During the 1941 season, you had two amazing players having great years. On one hand you had Ted Williams who hit .406 during the whole season, he was the first player to do it since Bill Terry hit .400 in 1930.

On the other hand you have Joe Dimaggio hitting in a record 56 straight games. Which is mind boggling

Now both of these things haven't been done since, and the odds of being broken anytime soon are slim in my opinion.

Which one do you guys believe is more impressive?
 

BJBirdy

Registered Member
It's close but I'm gonna go with the .406 batting average because you have to keep up a 2-5 pace over a 162 game span, whereas in the other case you only have to maintain a 1-whatever pace for 56. Granted, I don't mean to belittle the hit streak in the least because it's an amazing accomplishment, I just think the .406 average is a more impressive accomplishment.
 

Crypticshock

Registered Member
Yeah the .406.

I mean, you could go 1/4 or 1/5 in 56 games and settle with a mediocre .237. The .406 just means you are more consistent and have a bigger impact in games.
 

StroShow

The return shall be legenday!
V.I.P.
I have to say Williams .406 BA. Dimaggio hit .408 during the streak, only 2 points higher than Williams entire season total. Both are great though. For example, Dimaggio's streak of 56 is light years ahead of Pete Rose's 44 game streak. Rose would have had to get 25 hits in his next 12 games with 3 doubles, 4 triples and 15 homers to equal what Dimaggio did.
 

willge87

Registered Member
Yeah, maintaining .406 over 154 games (as Williams would've done) is more impressive, although the fact that nobody has come close to matching DiMaggio makes his hitting streak extremely impressive as well.
 
Both feats are truly impressive but to me, a .406 batting average overall is more significant because that means you're on the bases on a consistent basis, which also means that you produce RBIs on a consistent basis too and that is what will make you win. The 56-game hit streak is awesome too but you can accomplish that by hitting one or 2 singles per game and the rest of the team won't be giving their pitcher the run support, so the 56-game hit streak can be deceiving if you take into account the batting average.
 

SHOELESSJOE3

Registered Member
I have to give the edge to the .406.
But too often on some baseball boards, Joe's 56 game record gets downplayed.
They will bring up a couple of lucky plays. Actually it was only one lucky play, lucky bounce.
A ground ball took a bad hop and struck SS Luke Appling in the chest or shoulder.
Official scoring that is a base hit, no error, some luck yes but a clean base hit.
Whats ignored, in all streaks there will most likely be some breaks, not just Joe but some others who came close.
Joe's game get covered by a microscope only because he holds the record.

After being stopped in game 57 he went on another streak, 16 or 17 games.
Thats 73 games and being blanked only one time.
It's Joe's style, not many walks and low strike outs. In the whole 1941 season, only 13 strike outs.
He was great at putting balls in play. You can't get a break if you strike out.
 

SHOELESSJOE3

Registered Member
EdgeHead said:
Both feats are truly impressive but to me, a .406 batting average overall is more significant because that means you're on the bases on a consistent basis, which also means that you produce RBIs on a consistent basis too and that is what will make you win. The 56-game hit streak is awesome too but you can accomplishor 2 singles per game a that by hitting one ot two singles the rest of the team won't be giving their pitcher the run support, so the 56-game hit streak can be deceiving if you take into account the batting average.


True but every player, hitter has that chance but no one has equalled Joe.
And when you consider it Pete Rose and that 44 is miles away from 56.
Consider this, Joe also hit in 61 consecutive games in the PCL. Sure minor league but still 61 and the PCL was considered on of the highest quality minor leagues.
Again Joe, low walks and low strike outs, big part of streaks, keep the ball in play.

Excuse my messing up some of your letters in your post, attempted to underline a portion but lost some of the letters.
 

Babe_Ruth

Sultan of Swat
Staff member
V.I.P.
Not to go off-topic, but DiMaggio having 369 home runs and only 361 strikeouts in his career is an outstanding feat - especially at the rate of some of the players strikeout numbers in a season in this day and age.

Back to the topic in hand. What makes Ted Williams .406 season pretty special in that during the last game of the season he was playing a doubleheader. He was already at .400 for the season, so he could have easily sat down. But, no, he refused to, and decided to play both games where he went 6-8 to finish the season with a .406 batting average.

If you want to read more on how impressive Williams 1941 season then I suggest you to read this article.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/18/sport ... d=all&_r=0

Some of those stats blew me away
 
Top