• Welcome to the PopMalt Forums! Whether you're new to forums or a veteran, welcome to our humble home on the web! We're a 20-year old forum community with thousands of discussions on entertainment, lifestyle, leisure, and more.

    Our rules are simple. Be nice and don't spam. Registration is free, so what are you waiting for? Join today!.

168-year-old British newspaper shut down

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
  • I saw this while checking email and I thought maybe some of our U.K. GFers would be interested. For those of you living there, did you read this title (or did family) regularly?

Here's the link to the story: Hack job! Murdoch axes paper to save deal - Yahoo! News

Basically, Rupert Murdoch owned this newspaper and used what one professor called "the nuclear option" to stop its publication completely amidst scandal.

This is the reasoning, apparently, which I'll quote from the report:

As allegations multiplied that its journalists hacked the voicemails of thousands of people, from child murder victims to the families of Britain's war dead, the tabloid hemorrhaged advertising, alienated millions of readers and posed a growing threat to Murdoch's hopes of buying broadcaster BSkyB.

  • Do you think that Murdoch should have just shut down the popular newspaper as he did, or would there have been a way to keep it going?


  • Also, for those that know about Rupert Murdoch's other enterprises (he owns Fox News, for example): do you think that this will raise questions elsewhere among his owned journalism businesses, or will people see it as simply corruption within one institution that Murdoch probably wouldn't have known about?
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
There's no way it would have survived a scandal this large. Mr. Murdoch did the right thing here; no point in trying to keep it in business when no-one would want to do business with it.

As for if it'll raise questions, it already has. There are numerous allegations amongst the public that Mr. Murdoch knew about it and OK'ed it.
 

Pugz

Ms. Malone
V.I.P.
Never read it; but he's right to shut it down. If the allegations are true then a lot of people will want to sue and/or compensation over preach of privacy and human rights; plus he could end up in court and end up paying out billions on top of all the suing and/or compensation.

Flush the evidence before the cops find it.
 

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
There's no way it would have survived a scandal this large. Mr. Murdoch did the right thing here; no point in trying to keep it in business when no-one would want to do business with it.

As for if it'll raise questions, it already has. There are numerous allegations amongst the public that Mr. Murdoch knew about it and OK'ed it.
Yeah, my only other thought was that it could possibly just be totally and completely re-staffed, maybe because it's such an old publication. But you're probably right about it surviving the scandal, Storm.
 

Nevyrmoore

AKA Ass-Bandit
Yeah, my only other thought was that it could possibly just be totally and completely re-staffed, maybe because it's such an old publication. But you're probably right about it surviving the scandal, Storm.
Wouldn't matter about it being re-staffed; this kind of publicity would be the kind that would stick with the paper, regardless of if new staff is brought in. Mr. Murdoch owns plenty more British newspapers, so he can rightly justify dumping one.
 

Unity

Living in Ikoria
Staff member
Just read an interesting follow-up related to this story, it looks like the U.S. FBI is investigating Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. after allegations that they tried to hack into cell phones of victims of the September 11th terror attacks.

AP source: FBI investigating News Corp. - Yahoo! News

AP source: FBI investigating News Corp.

By TOM HAYS - Associated Press | AP – 2 hrs 23 mins ago

NEW YORK (AP) — A law enforcement official says the FBI has opened an investigation into allegations that media mogul Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. sought to hack into the phones of Sept. 11 victims.


The official spoke Thursday on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly.


New York City-based News Corp. has been in crisis mode.


A rival newspaper reported last week that the company's News of the World had hacked into the phone of U.K. teenage murder victim Milly Dowler in 2002 and may have impeded a police investigation into the 13-year-old's disappearance.
More possible victims soon emerged: other child murder victims, 2005 London bombing victims, the families of dead soldiers and former Prime Minister Gordon Brown.


The FBI's New York office hasn't commented. There's been no response from News Corp. or to a message left with the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan.
 

butty92

Registered Member
It is good to see New International now acting to put things right. They have withdrawn themselves from the 61 % of the B Sky B they do not own, apologised to the Dowler family, Rebekah Brooks has resigned and they are facing up to the consequences of their actions in the courts next week.
 

uclgeogphd

Registered Member
Controversially I don't think wiping the paper off the face of the earth was the correct thing to do. I think its important to remember that phone hacking wasn't the job of everyone at the paper but a minority to get high profile stories and these orders seemingly have come from the top of newscorp hierarchy. Dumping the paper is at best a public gesture as it gives the illusion that you are doing something about the practice. In reality innocent journalists and others working for the paper lose their jobs to protect the few that really matter to Newscorp and the Murdochs ie themselves.

It wasn't the best paper out there but there were, and still are, a lot worse and to be fair its football coverage was pretty good.
 
Top